Groves Scriptor





Advisor: 
Laura Redman
Editors:
Imani Roberson
Ava Scott
Emily Stillman
Fayth Kakos
Reporters:
Christian Zeitvogel 
Connor Bradbury
Connor Mason
Eric Gaines
Karlie Sherwood
Madi Drake
Misha Adler
Molly Ryan
Omar Mitchell
Ross House
Ali Abdalla

Adele Album Review

    Lounging across my bed on a lazy Saturday afternoon, I idly flipped through the pages of my biology textbook, halfheartedly scrawling notes on the endoplasmic reticulum of animal cells, when the door to my room crashed open. As is often the manner of my older sister, knocking is just a suggestion, and not one to be taken very seriously for that matter. With her phone grasped excitedly in her white knuckled hand, her headphones swinging to the floor with reckless abandon, and an expression of cunning jubilation etched into her face that was all too familiar to me, I was well prepared for what was coming next.

            “Fayth, you HAVE to hear this song!”

            And with that lively backdrop, I was introduced to Adele’s explosive return to the music industry following a 3 year hiatus. My favorites were “Water Under the Bridge,” “When We Were Young,” and “Send My Love (To Your New Lover).” If I had to choose one, it would be “Water Under the Bridge.” When Adele belts out, “Let me photograph you in this light/in case this is the last time/that we might be exactly like we were before we realized/we were scared of getting old/it made us restless,” you can feel her urgency to capture that idyllic immortality of youth that is so fleeting and passes by so swiftly. You can almost feel it slipping through your fingers. Even me, at the tender age of 18, couldn’t help but get swept up into the vivid imagery she created. Standing at the precipice of adulthood, this song felt incredibly relatable to me. Although Adele is referencing an entirely different time in her life, I could relate to it as well because it deals with an ending of sorts. That desire to hold onto what we know and what is comfortable, and that fear of losing out on uncomplicated youth is evident in what she is trying to convey. They all had different styles to them, but were immeasurably great in different ways. This entire album had such a fresh take on Adele. She has such an extraordinary voice, that I always expected the great quality of the music, but this time it was the whole package. The lyrics, the instrumental, the voice; they all wrapped together into one magnificent gift. This album had a very reminiscent quality about it, which was clearly seen through the very strong time motif intricately weaved into the romantic songs. She is acknowledging the all too real reality of aging and time passing. This felt like both a remembrance of her past, as well as a welcoming of her future and an acceptance of her presence. Adele seamlessly pulled off what all artists strive for, an uninhibited longing to go out and live your life.

*Read more in the upcoming June 2016 issue of the Scriptor
Article by Fayth Kakos 

Groves' First Ever Male Beauty Pageant

Sydney Laub
Vance Joy Concert
Vance Joy singing his closing number, "Fire and the Flood", at Caesars Windsor on January 25th, 2016.
Vance Joy performing his hit single, "Riptide", at Caesars Windsor on January 25th, 2016.
 
Vance Joy performing the song "Emmylou" from his EP, God Loves You When You're Dancing, at Caesars Windsor on January 25th, 2016.
Vance Joy singing his opening number, "Mess is Mine," from his first album, Dream Your Life Away at Caesars Windsor on January 25th, 2016.

On Monday, January 25th, three of my best friends and I went to Canada to see one of our favorite artists, Vance Joy, at Caesars Windsor for his “Fire and the Flood” tour. Our anticipation for his performance built as we waited to get by customs and eagerly sat in Coliseum an hour prior to the start of the concert --just to claim our seats and scope out the venue. We listened to his opening act, Reuben and the Dark and soon enough Joy came out to start his performance and I was immediately reminded of everything I love about concerts.

Live music is something that I haven’t really figured out yet; I think that there’s a lot of extra “noise” around recorded music we hear on the radio and listen to out of our ear buds. This noise can distract from the artist’s voice, their lyrics, and what it all means. Joy’s performance, however, was simple. He got on stage with his guitar and just sang his indie-rock songs; it was truly the perfect juxtaposition of a fire and a flood. The song “Emmylou” from his EP, God Loves You When You’re Dancing was calming and humbling, it brought a hush over crowd as we all listened to his angelic voice. In contrast, the closing number, “Fire and the Flood” from his album Dream Your Life Away brought life and energy to everyone around as we sang and danced. Joy even occasionally gave the audience insight into what his songs mean, which I appreciated.

There was no intricate choreography, no back- up dancers, no wardrobe changes, and no distractions. It was beautiful in its simplicity. There was one moment while Joy sang the song “Riptide” that I looked behind me and saw the faces of the crowd singing in unison. In that moment we were all apart of something bigger than ourselves, and I felt something that only live music can make you feel: exceptionally alive.

Article and photos by Sydney Laub
A winter in Michigan 
Living in Michigan you will learn that the weather here is crazy and unpredictable. This time last year the ground was covered knee high with snow. Looking outside right now, all I see is dead grass and trees with no leaves. It’s February 4th today and it has probably snowed about five times this winter. It has rained more than it has snowed. On Christmas morning, Michigan woke up to see no snow at all. It was our first green Christmas in probably forever. I took this picture because I was in shock when I saw it was snowing. I was just about to walk into DSW. Last year today there was snow everywhere and it was freezing cold. I woke up this morning to find it surprisingly warm and rainy. Winter is over soon and I have a feeling this summer will either be very cold or scorching hot. Michigan is well known for its bipolar weather. I love this picture because it shows the beauty of Michigan, even when its not.
Grove's girl's varsity basketball beats Oak Park to remain undefeated

The Grove’s varsity girls basketball team beat Oak Park Friday, January 29th to bring their record The Grove’s varsity girls basketball team beat Oak Park Friday, January 29th to bring their record to 11 wins and 4 losses. Despite the four losses they are currently undefeated in their division. They managed to secure an early lead against Oak Park, and ended the first half with a score of 44-10.  Even though they were ahead by 34 points going into the second half they didn’t let up on their opponent. The final score of the game was 60-24. Sha Carter led scoring with 22 points and Nya Lewis was second for the falcons with 11 points.
         
Staff and Students Speak Out About Candidates and Campaign Strategies 

Video by: Madi Drake and Janai Williams





Robotics team helping with Flint water crisis


Students can help the Robotics team raise 2,960 bottles of water by dropping off a case of water to the robotics lab at Seaholm at 3pm-5pm on January 27th - February 5th to send to Flint to help children in need.


Q&A with Engineering Technology teacher and Co-robotics Coach Rosa Everitt:


Shane Donovan: So why did you choose this cause?


Rosa Everitt: As a mom, it really bothers me that there are children who don’t have clean water. I think about my boys, and they take baths and they swim and play in the water and they have a great time. And I don’t even think about it if they drink the water. Just knowing that there has to be this concern that those kids are being poisoned just really upsets me. No parent, child, or person in general should ever have to live with the fear of a resource like that hurting their lives.


SD: Why do you encourage students to donate to the cause?


RE: Well, you never know when someone needs something. In Birmingham, or Waterford, or in Clarkston, we don’t know that somebody is in need. But now we do. And I just think that taking a simple four dollars and buying a case of water and giving back to someone who can’t necessarily buy the water, or to a family who’s already got so much on their mind is the smallest way that as a 14 or 18 year old, we can give back to someone.


SD: How will you get the water there?


RE: As far as the robotics team, we do have a trailer, which we’ll be loading up to get water in there. We have trucks, we have Ford Flexes, we have parents who are already willing to jump on board to help bring the water over to Art Van in Royal Oak. We’re going to bring the water over there to send up to Flint. Article: by Shane Donovan


Friday the 13th Becomes a Young Mans Lucky Day

Trevor Sullivan has spent the last 9 months of his life fighting a rare heat condition. But this past Friday, November 13th. Trevor received his new heart. At 4:30pm Trevor went in for his surgery and at 9pm that night. Trevor was reunited with his family soon after. Trevor was sedated awaiting the okay that his heart had taken and that he would have the breathing tube removed. At 5:30 Trevor was awake and responding the best he could. "He was knotting his head yes and no. He could grip our hands. He knew he was going to be okay" said Philip Sullivan, Trevor's dad.
Around 12:30am on Saturday the 14th Trevor's doctors removed the breathing tube. "Words can't simply say enough..." said Philip Sullivan when a video was posted of Trevor after the breathing tube was removed and he was no longer sedated. 
"I feel amazing" said Trevor Sullivan. 
Take a minute and watch the video below.

Article by: Karlie Sherwood
Video by: Philip Sullivan

                                                                            Socially Charitable
    When I think of the term “charity event” I usually think of an event that includes something hand’s on or active. Something like a color run, a dance marathon, or even something like where a large group of people gets together and helps refurbish a house. What I didn’t connotate that term with was getting dressed up for a night out with my best friends while dancing to great music. The Toys For Tots Charity Dance event was unlike any other form of community service or charity work I’d ever participated in before. The dance is held every year, starting back about 5 years ago. It is chaired by the Toys for Tots Foundation as well as one Seaholm student who steps up to the plate to plan and organize everything. This year, the event was held at the Troy Community Center. The cost to enter the dance was either the donation of one or more unwrapped toys, or a donation of $10 or more. All of the toys donated and proceeds were donated to families in need, with small children who couldn’t afford the luxury of play toys. The attire was formal, girls in Christmas-esque dresses with fancy heels, and boys in button downs and sweaters. The live party music was DJ’ed by one of Seaholm’s very own students, a student who goes by the DJ name of King Spookey. To complete the feel of a classy event, tables were decorated with textured tablecloths and elegant center pieces, while the buffet tables held arrays of various desserts that were all donated by the students.

    The overall atmosphere of the event was lively and fun. Student’s were crowding the already packed dance floor, dancing with everyone as the DJ played mashups of new hit songs. Almost everywhere you looked, groups of people could be seen engaging in conversations where everyone burst out laughing every ten seconds. The shrieks of friends who hadn’t seen each other in a while was followed by the flash of a camera, documenting the picture that would later end up on social media, portraying their smiling faces with their arms wrapped around one another. The energy that buzzed throughout the event hall was contagious; not one person stood alone, and not one person looked like they weren’t enjoying themselves. It probably didn’t help that the amount of treats offered gave its consumers a sugar rush. Everyone who participated in the Toys For Tots Dance was happy to be surrounded by great friends, and knowing that they were participating in an event that not only benefitted each student’s social life, but an event that benefitted those less fortunate.



How to Make the Most of November

With school getting back into the swing of things and finals steadily approaching, you may feel like you are on the brink of imploding this November. But don’t worry, I’ve compiled a list of five things that can help make this dreadful month a little less stressful and a lot more fun.

    Whether you’re a guy or girl, this is the perfect time to put away those razors and get ready to participate in No-shave November. Ladies, there is no longer a need to shave your legs. Throw on a pair of long pants and let it grow. Gents, don’t be afraid to show off your masculinity and grow a beard or mustache, if you can. All this extra hair might even keep you a little warmer with all the cold weather approaching.

    Don’t want to release your hairy inner beast? That’s okay. There are other ways to express yourself. One of which is writing, which you can totally do this November because it’s National Novel Writing Month. NaNoWriMo is the perfect opportunity to step out of your comfort zone and actually do something productive with your life. Get out your typewriters, laptops, and pencils because you still have 50,000 words to go.

    Of course, not all of us have the time or patience to write an entire novel in one month, but that doesn’t mean you have to waste all your energy on Netflix and Tumblr. Instead, you can get a head start on studying for the most stressful thing of all… finals. This year, don’t put it all off until the last minute. Stop procrastinating and start making flashcards.

    From studying comes stress. That’s why it’s important to take breaks and have some fun. And what better way to do that than by seeing this year’s production of Grease? You can see the show on November 6-8 and 13-15. It’s sure to be electrifying!

    You better shape up, because the holiday season is coming and guess who’s already checked his list twice. Get into the holiday spirit early this year. After all, ‘tis almost the season to be merry, so why not do some good deeds or get started on your holiday shopping?

    In the end, there is no denying it. November is and always has been a pretty lousy month, but if you take the time and effort, you might just be able to break free of the mediocrity and monotony that have inexplicably become a part of it and actually have a little fun.

Article By: Molly Ryan

3 Easy tips for finals by Connor Mason

Finals. The bane of every high school students existence. They’re here again and not slowing down for any student, so what can you do to make sure you’re prepared for them? Fear not, I have a list of 3 golden rules for finals.


  1. Ask any student who has actually taken a final and they will tell you the hardest part of finals is the endless amounts of studying. When you’re sitting down at the table with your head in a book getting literally nothing out of the experience at 2 am, it can be extremely overwhelming. A good way to deal with studying for finals is to split up your time into small increments so you have a break once every hour and start ahead of time so you’re never cramming at the last minute.

  2. Make sure not to overwork yourself, like i said you should be taking breaks. One other way to combat exhaustion can be to keep yourself healthy. This means going to sleep at a reasonable hour, keeping yourself hydrated and even having a snack if you need it. Apples are a good way to keep yourself alert as well as any iced tea you might have around.

  3. The last rule is probably the most important, make sure to be organized. If you really care about doing well on your finals then you won't mess around with your study time. If you are organized, you can make a schedule with what you want to study and when. For example: If you have gotten good grades in a particular unit for a class, move your study time for that chapter to the end of the week so you have more time for other units that you might have had a harder time on.


Overall, finals can be pretty stressful. If you can manage your time correctly then they aren’t so bad. Just remember to take breaks, be organized and get as much sleep as you need.
Birmingham Teachers, Secretaries, and Paraprofessionals Rally Again for a Contract


Yet again, teachers, secretaries, and paraprofessionals demonstrated their support for each other and desire for an equitable contract during a rally on October 20.  On September 29, many of the same staff members marched around Birmingham's public Administration building, urging the district to provide a fair contract, a rally that resulted in the district agreeing to the teacher union's economic proposal.  Nearly one month later, the BPS staff rallied again, partly because that contract never materialized.  


Groves mathematics teachers Eric Springer and Cristina Antoniolli represented the secretaries at the protest on October 11.  Antoniolli explained why they were holding a sign for secretaries when they are teachers. “The secretaries of our school are what allow the whole structure of our school to function," Antoniolli said. "Without them, the schools definitely wouldn’t run as well. We’re all together, and we don’t like how the secretaries and paraprofessionals are being treated by the school district.”

Many of the protests revolved around staff displeasure for the large amount of currently unused money in the district's Fund- Equity, money the protesters felt should go toward the classroom and staff members who impact the classroom.  

Groves social studies teacher Geoff Wickersham explained his stance on the use of fund-equity as well as his optimism for the outcome of the protest to bring the union and the administration together.

"They [the District administration] actually have twice the amount of fund-equity that is recommended by the state. They recommend only ten million dollars; our board has twenty million dollars. We just hope the district realizes that quality staff require a quality salary. For most teachers that are on steps [a pay-grade ‘ladder or pyramid’], their pay-grades are entered at the beginning of the year. We have a lot of young teachers here, and this is how they get an advance up the pay-grade scale. Having a contract in place keeps our cost steady. We know what to expect. We can plan many of our expenses and budget things like our insurances, retirement plans and social security, and other family benefits ,like our kids and saving for their college. Otherwise, it’s just like last year, and we feel an insecurity," Wickersham  said. “I’m still hopeful, though.  Hopefully they’ll [the District] get the message. However, if we do have to come out again when it’s colder and wetter, then we’ll come out here again and again.”


Groves theater teacher and president of Groves Performing Arts Company (GPAC) John Rutherford stands up for the  BPS staff at the protest on October 20.   Staff members stayed outside the board meeting that night because they were warned they might anger the board of education if they went in to speak on behalf of teachers, secretaries, and paraprofessionals on their desire for contract that reflects their high rankings and increased workload.

In response to this second demonstration, deputy superintendent for [Birmingham] school administration Paul DeAngelis clarified some of the District's hesitations for agreeing to the unions' proposals and wanted to clarify what he heard as rumors that emerged at the protest.

"I think, when we’re often in contract and board meetings, we often equate that increases in salary with appreciation [of staff], and that’s fair. I think in this district we have done a very good job, speaking from a teacher’s stance, because we have not had to compromise on class sizes. Our class sizes are as low as any of our peer districts, if not lower than most of them, DeAngelis said.  "I think that this is one of the things that are sometimes forgotten when talking about appreciation for staff. While I understand the equation of the appreciation tied to salary, I also recognize the financial limitations that school districts have right now. What I think is most important is that we make the best decisions for the kids, and I think class sizes is one of the most important things we can do to demonstrate that we appreciate the work our people do around here, and that we’re going to commit our resources to create the most optimal learning environment for our students and our staff.”

During the protest, there were several signs that made accusations against the District wasting $700,000 on bathrooms.  DeAngelis  said that this was inaccurate.
“There was a small misrepresentation of the board report that was released on September 20th. The increase was only $7,000, and this was to amend a project that had gone poorly by a contractor several years ago," DeAngelis said. "The district spent a significant amount of money to renovate bathrooms at our three middle schools. There was a claim against the contractor that they couldn’t effectively finish the job. Insurance covered some things, but there was a small raise in order to fix the final piece of that product.”

This was one point that  superintendent doctor Daniel Nerad interjected during Birmingham Education Association president Scott Warrow's speech to the board, a speech where Warrow expressed that the administration was "spending money on what made the district look good not what made it be good: its staff".  Part of helping the district become better, Warrow suggested was not just telling the staff they were appreciated for award winning teachers, secretaries, and paraprofessionals but to show the staff through better compensation.  This could include using surplus in the fund equity to compensate for earlier economic
concessions on the part of all three unions. 

In response to this idea of using Fund- Equity money, DeAngelis worried that such use would damage the fund's sustainability and equated the use of fund-equity for the classroom to those who misuse credit.
"Y
ou’re spending more than you bring in, which has become the American way it seems. Everyone carries a credit card, and there’s so much credit card debt because people spend more money than they can afford; it’s not sustainable. In a school district it’s certainly not sustainable either. In order to maintain class size and afford the programs we want for our students, we have to be responsible with our money. We simply can’t keep spending more than we bring in; we have to at least slow down how much we spend," DeAngelis said. "I think, most importantly, what is often missed in this whole issue is that our board ‘disagrees’ for the most part around the rate of spending [of Fund-Equity]. Our board does appreciate our people, and I know they’ve been hammered at the podium in public that the district has been hollow because we haven’t been giving salary increases. That’s not true. The board has given salary increases every single year. It’s about how much those salary increases are.  It’s unfortunate that, often times, people equate salary increases with appreciation. I think the board has shown many other ways of how committed the board is to its students, staff, and the district that demonstrate our gratitude.” 

At the end of his speech, on October 20, Warrow urged the board and administration to show that gratitude by calling the lawyer they had hired to help them with over forty bargaining sessions and have him draw up an agreement to ratify the contract that night.

Article and photos by Christian Zeitvogel



The Best Halloween Movies by Connor Mason 10/27/2015

It’s that time of the year again, Halloween. Costumes are being prepared, pumpkins are being carved, candy is en-route to your house and decorations are already looking scary. Whether you like it or not, this spooky atmosphere can influence your movie options! But worry not, there is a surprising amount of Halloween movies for the whole family.


The Nightmare Before Christmas: This movie is possibly the most iconic Halloween movie of all time. Written by the infamous Tim Burton and animated by disney, i think that we can all agree this movie touched our hearts. Jack Skellington the Pumpkin King no longer enjoys Halloween and after traveling to Christmas Town he is inspired to take the reigns on this holiday. Although this movie has a somewhat creepy animation style, i personally believe that this movie is essential to the celebration of such a scary holiday.


Halloween Town: Perhaps one of the most memorable disney movies, A young girl who learns that she is a witch puts her skills to the task. Accompanied by a few siblings and a magic wielding grandma, this girl helps to save a whole town of supernatural creatures. If you are looking for a somewhat spooky movie for the kids, this would be a safe bet!


Casper: Have you been looking for the perfect blend of paranormal activity and family fun? Look no further, This movie would be great for a younger child because it isn’t scary at all. Casper is a friendly ghost and it shows as he tries to help a “ghost therapist” and his daughter throughout this movie. The main villain’s in this movie are 3 troublemaking ghosts who have no regard for personal space but there is also a money grubbing villain who we see a lot of as well. Worry not though, with Casper helping this family almost nothing can go wrong.


Hocus Pocus: Made in 1993, Hocus Pocus tells the story of two teenagers, a young girl and an immortal cat on Halloween night. Their quest is to stop 3 witches who are resurrected into Salem, Massachusetts after centuries of being dead. This movie definitely has a few laughs and is easily a classic.


The Haunted Mansion: This goofy halloween movie stars Eddie Murphy as the father of a family who moves into a haunted mansion. After figuring out that the mansion is haunted, this family tries to escape their funny environment. The movie also teaches a few good lessons and could be good for younger children who only want laughs.


These 5 halloween movies are vitally important to any child’s holiday experience. If you are interested in watching them most are available on netflix or on ABC Family’s “13 Days of Halloween” marathon. I for one, have seen The Nightmare Before Christmas 3 separate times last  weekend! Don’t forget to enjoy your Halloween Falcons!
Groves Varsity Football Interviews by Imani Roberson
Birmingham Groves Varsity football has gone undefeated leaving many excited for playoffs. Our reporters managed to grab an interview with Cedric Boswell. Enjoy and don't forget to check in for interviews, info and more relating to football. 



Groves Varsity Football Seeking for an Undefeated Season

Birmingham Groves Varsity football has experienced an impressive year so far, currently undefeated in their season. On October 9th, during our homecoming game, Varsity took on Berkely for the OAA Blue Division Championship, and came out victorious with an end score of 47-14. Most recently, on October 16th, our Varsity shutout Royal Oak High School, concluding the game 42-0. On October 23rd, Groves will face Ann Arbor Pioneer at home for its last game before moving onto playoffs. Varsity head coach Brendan Flaherty explained what the team has done to be so successful, some of the highlights of the season, as well as how the team is now preparing for their finale game on October 23rd and the rapidly approaching playoffs. 

Christian Zeitvogel: “Regarding the huge victory over Berkely, what is the significance of that game and the league championship?”

Coach Flaherty: “We were both tied for first place, so the winner would win the title [the OAA Blue League Championship].”

CZ: “How does that victory affect Groves going forward with our ranking and division placement?”

CF: “Every victory helps us regarding our ranking and our image when it comes time for playoffs. It improves our placement in district games. It not only effects the league title, but it also gives us a foothold for the title.”

CZ: “Regarding the most recent huge victory for Groves against Royal Oak, with a 42-0 lead, how did you guys prepare for the game?”

CF: “I believe the guys did a great job during the game. It was a very ‘chippy’ week in practice; the guys were on edge, it’s [Varsity] a tough place to play, but we were much improved going over there. They took care of business.”

CZ: “Do you have any highlights of the game? It was mentioned that both Cedric Boswell and Ernest Allen had a stellar performance that game. Could you elaborate?”

CF: “I think one of the highlights for us was with Samaad Ali, he had a huge play with an interception on a boot route. Both Cedric and Ernest had phenomenal runs and they always do great things. Actually, there was also J.P. Culbertson. On the last play of the game, he [Culbertson] made a huge sack; He stuffed their offense so they couldn’t score and rose to the occasion. I thought that was a highlight I would remember too.”

CZ: “With the playoffs coming up after Pioneer, what are you guys looking forward to? Or is there anything specific that you will do to prepare for the playoffs since it is a different level?”

CF: “We want to win playoff games; we want to win, instead of just being satisfied with getting into the playoffs. Regarding preparation, I think will take notes from the swim team when they start going into States. They go into tapering. So we’ll try and cut back the amount of time that guys are on the field. We want them at their best for game nights. Just like a swimmer in their ‘taper-mode’, trying to get more sleep, cut their practice sessions, and watch what they eat, and an emphasis on drinking water.”

CZ: “What would you say is one of the team’s biggest strengths right now?”

CF: “I think we’re at a real high level of competiveness. There’s a lot of guys that are really competitive and are never satisfied in just winning. That’s good, and we don’t want to lose that energy. We have intense practices, and it carries over into the games, which I love.” 

Article By Christian Zeitvogel

Groves Upholds School of Character Designation Through School Wide Service In the same light as Falcon Family Friday and the formation of student sections for each sport, the school is coming together once again, this time for community service.  Make a Difference Day is on October 24th and the school is taking nearly 100 students to volunteer at Dossin Elementary school in Detroit. Students will work together on various beautification projects within the school which include painting lockers.  In order to participate, volunteers must have their permission slips turned into the office by October 21st.  Counselor Norman Hurns is one of the main coordinators of the event and believes that this service project will represent Groves being a school of character.

“Make a difference day has been going on for almost 25 years and it’s the largest day of volunteerism in the United States.  Going forward we want to make sure that we’re still doing things within the community,” Hurns said.  “Also it’s an opportunity to help a school in Detroit and change the environment and we’re going to take three hours to make that happen”.  

This is the current state of the hallways at Dossin Elementary School in Detroit.  Students will work together to beautify the school and create a better learning environment on October 21st. 

Article by Imani Roberson, Photos courtesy of Counselor Norman Hurns 

Groves Varsity Football Seeking for an Undefeated Season

Birmingham Groves Varsity football has experienced an impressive year so far, currently undefeated in their season. On October 9th, during our homecoming game, Varsity took on Berkely for the OAA Blue Division Championship, and came out victorious with an end score of 47-14. Most recently, on October 16th, our Varsity shutout Royal Oak High School, concluding the game 42-0. On October 23rd, Groves will face Ann Arbor Pioneer at home for its last game before moving onto playoffs. Varsity head coach Brendan Flaherty explained what the team has done to be so successful, some of the highlights of the season, as well as how the team is now preparing for their finale game on October 23rd and the rapidly approaching playoffs. 

Christian Zeitvogel: “Regarding the huge victory over Berkely, what is the significance of that game and the league championship?”

Coach Flaherty: “We were both tied for first place, so the winner would win the title [the OAA Blue League Championship].”

CZ: “How does that victory affect Groves going forward with our ranking and division placement?”

CF: “Every victory helps us regarding our ranking and our image when it comes time for playoffs. It improves our placement in district games. It not only effects the league title, but it also gives us a foothold for the title.”

CZ: “Regarding the most recent huge victory for Groves against Royal Oak, with a 42-0 lead, how did you guys prepare for the game?”

CF: “I believe the guys did a great job during the game. It was a very ‘chippy’ weak in practice; the guys were on edge, it’s [Varsity] a tough place to play, but we were much improved going over there. They took care of business.”

CZ: “Do you have any highlights of the game? It was mentioned that both Cedric Boswell and Ernest Allen had a stellar performance that game. Could you elaborate?”

CF: “I think one of the highlights for us was with Samaad Ali, he had a huge play with an interception on a boot route. Both Cedric and Ernest had phenomenal runs and they always do great things. Actually, there was also J.P. Culbertson. On the last play of the game, he [Culbertson] made a huge sack; He stuffed their offense so they couldn’t score and rose to the occasion. I thought that was a highlight I would remember too.”

CZ: “With the playoffs coming up after Pioneer, what are you guys looking forward to? Or is there anything specific that you will do to prepare for the playoffs since it is a different level?”

CF: “We want to win playoff games; we want to win, instead of just being satisfied with getting into the playoffs. Regarding preparation, I think will take notes from the swim team when they start going into States. They go into tapering. So we’ll try and cut back the amount of time that guys are on the field. We want them at their best for game nights. Just like a swimmer in their ‘taper-mode’, trying to get more sleep, cut their practice sessions, and watch what they eat, and an emphasis on drinking water.”

CZ: “What would you say is one of the team’s biggest strengths right now?”

CF: “I think we’re at a real high level of competiveness. There’s a lot of guys that are really competitive and are never satisfied in just winning. That’s good, and we don’t want to lose that energy. We have intense practices, and it carries over into the games, which I love.” 

Article By Christian Zeitvogel

ANNUAL VICTORY DAY PROVES SUCCESSFUL AND FUN FOR ALL
Thursday, October 15 was Grovesannual Victory Day during halftime at the JV football game, a day that gave students with mental disabilities the opportunity to either score a touchdown against the Groves Varsity Football team or cheer with the Groves Varsity Cheer team. This year was a huge turnout, with about ten students getting the chance to score a touchdown and several to cheer. Many of these students said Victory Day was a highlight of their year.
Photos and article by Connor Bradbury

Senior Victoria Lyon takes her position in the backfield with varsity football head coach Coach Flaherty to receive the hand-off from Varsity quarterback junior Beau Kewley during Victory Day on Thursday, October 15.


Groves Cheer Team, along with senior Victoria Lyon and sixth grader Paige Tenjeras cheer on the football team during Victory Day on Thursday, October 15.



Varsity Football Team celebrates senior Daniel Zwierzchowskis touchdown run on Victory Day on Thursday, October 15.

Senior Kate Kauffman gets ready to take the field with senior Varsity Football player Dylan Walton during Victory Day on Thursday, October 15.



 


 

 

EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION
Second graders are really something else. I don’t usually spend a ton of my time surrounded by seven and eight year olds, but this year I signed up for the experiential education class here at Groves and got placed in a 2nd grade classroom at Beverly Elementary down the street. Consequently, I spend an hour a day helping kids figure out how to add, spell and properly write the letter “G” (it’s harder than you’d think). Three weeks into my time as a teacher’s assistant in the classroom, I’ve heard some pretty hilarious things said by my students:


*Doing a worksheet about Columbus Day*

“Columbus was the first president, right?”

“No, not quite, he was actually an explorer who said across the Ocean…”

“Right right, oh yeah, and then there was a war with England and that’s how America became a state.”

“I know six people named Emily. My babysitter Emily, my neighbor Emily, my cousin Emily, my invisible friend named Emily, the Emily in the other class, and you!”


“You smell so good.”


“Last night I painted an abstract painting of banana peels.”


Alright, kids.


If this sounds entertaining to you,  take experiential education. You can learn a lot! Contact your counselor or Mr. Wicker for more information.

Emily Stillman
NICK CAVE: HERE HEAR

Soundsuit. Sounds weird, right? What do you imagine? When I first heard of artist Nick Cave’s soundsuits all I could picture was a little man in the one man band get up--not very creative sounding. 
My vision couldn’t have been more different from Cave’s. Cave’s work is interesting because it isn’t just series of costumes on display over mannequins. They are used in Cave’s performances which are both visually pleasing and oddly enough intriguing to the ear--hence the name “soundsuits.” I only had enough time at the exhibition at the Cranbrook Art Museum to view one of the four taped performances on loop in the viewing room. I watched one entitled Bunny Boy. I couldn’t tell you what story he was trying to tell, but what I can tell you is that Cave exhibits a clear understanding of how to work a space and use light. Cave used the singular spotlight to highlight the movement of the fur on his bunny suit and then to disappear into the darkness either for story purposes or possible so that the viewer could hear the sounds of the suit while not being distracted by the soundsuit itself, a decorated, hot-pink mass of fur. 
I was invited by chance to the last day of this exhibit which was October 11, so his work is no longer on display at the Cranbrook Art Museum. If he does come back to the Detroit area though, I would highly recommend seeing Cave’s work.

Article and photos by Ava Scott


This piece entitled Hustle Coat is not one of Cave’s soundsuits, but it is a piece that I found particularly interesting. Cave’s statements about his pieces show that they have a lot more depth than some art is given credit for. His piece was not only beautiful and interesting to look at, but was representative of one of Cave’s specific memories of visiting Chicago and seeing hot goods out of a man’s trench coat for the first time.


This piece entitled Hustle Coat is not one of Cave’s soundsuits, but it is a piece that I found particularly interesting. Cave’s statements about his pieces show that they have a lot more depth than some art is given credit for. His piece was not only beautiful and interesting to look at, but was representative of one of Cave’s specific memories of visiting Chicago and seeing hot goods out of a man’s trench coat for the first time.


Many of Cave’s pieces at this exhibit incorporated small porcelain birds. The suit itself is also embroidered with an owl over the stomach which tied the body hugging fabric portion to the elaborate head and shoulder piece overhanging much of the torso and haloing the top portion of the mannequin.


Unfortunately, not all of the soundsuits were shown in action. In fact not all of them can be worn to be functional in a performance. The suit in the center foreground is made almost entirely of sock monkeys. I wish I had an explanation for this piece because I would have loved to have known the intentions behind it. While sock monkeys bring a feeling of silliness and childish glee, seeing them all stacked up on top of each other filled me with a sadness and feeling of neglect. Especially now with such an important turning point in the my life coming up, I feel like this mountain of monkeys is symbolic of the childhood that is now being left in the past.



Juniors Earn Victory in Powderpuff
In a nail-biting conclusion, the junior team achieved victory over the seniors, with the marginally close final score of 28-27, in the annual senior vs. junior PowderPuff girl’s flag football game on October 7th. After falling behind in the third quarter, the juniors made a comeback in the final moments of the fourth quarter, scoring one last touchdown to put them ahead of the seniors. 


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Junior quarterback Sophie Davis gives the hand-off to Junior running-back Lexxe Lipsey for an outside run on the thirty- yard line for the junior offense.

Senior running-back Nandia Dixon runs the ball for a several yard gain for the senior offense in the second quarter on October 7th

Junior running-back Lexxe Lipsey makes the outside run for the junior offense. Lipsey’s flag was soon captured at the line of scrimmage by a senior defender.

Article and Photos by Christian Zeitvogel

Trevor Palooza 

Local community member Marie Watson held an event to raise awareness for freshman Trevor Sullivan and his need for a heart transplant on Sunday, September 20 at the Southfield Municipal. Last year Sullivan was diagnosed with severe heart failure meaning that one of the valves in his heart malfunctions, causing blood to constantly flow into the heart.  This will ultimately lead to extreme swelling of the organ. The heart transplant has many potential medical complications and can cost around one million dollars according to the National Foundation for Transplants. Trevor Palooza helped to raise money for Sullivan’s procedure, hospital fees, and the family’s hotel fees. The event offered food, clowns, magicians, and live music. Sullivan’s doctors did not permit him to leave the hospital for his event; however, the event still went on and had a large turnout in support for his cause.




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This is a sign pointing to the building where Trevor Palooza was held.

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Nor McIntyre, the lead singer of Moonshine Stew, performing at Trevor Palooza on Sunday, September 20 to help support the Sullivan family. “The Sullivan’s always gave back to the community, so I decide to give back too.”





The Running Young's


Like a modern version of the beloved band Blink-182, The Running Young's first and newest album Don’t Go Away show cases the many talents of the five 20 some year olds who have been rocking out since they were adolescents. Sam Klos, Jack Hoover, and Andrew Brauer answer some questions for me about the new album and what's it like to be up and coming rock stars.

How long have you been a band?

Sam Klos: Probably since 8th grade. Were different pieces of different bands but the main structure comes from the 8th grade group, but me and Jack are originals.

Andrew Brauer: I was in a rival band at the time, along with our drummer Brian. It was the same kind of music, and we performed at a competition together and that's how we got to know Jack and Sam.


What instruments do you play?

Jack Hoover: I am the guitarist and bassist depending on who wrote the song, me an Sam switch around.

Andrew Brauer: I play guitar, and sometimes shout vocals.

Sam Klos: Brian Oliverio is our drummer and Zach McCarter does keyboard


How did you come up with your band name?

Sam Klos: I know we wanted running in it and I know that Jack was really into neil young at the time. So It all kind of fell into place ending with being the running youngs.


Could you tell me about your new album?

Sam Klos: A lot of bands will collect money go to a studio or something like that but we being college kids, we don't have that kind of money. So we wrote all of our music. Were really happy with it. I took 2 classes at schoolcraft college just for digital recording and stuff. We have just a little experience but it was all really just a work in progress, a experiment. we nearly finished recording it the first time and we hated it. so we scratched it all and started up again. It went by a lot after but there were feuds. but it came together and we are really proud of it.


What's your favorite song on the new album?

Sam Klos: I wrote a song called how to get burned it’s about how first love at age 16 and how that starts and ends and how you get thru it. That's the first song we really all wrote together in the same room so it's really meaningful for us.

Jack Hoover: Faders my favorite, mostly because me and Jack got to write it together

Andrew Brauer: Jessie, it’s the best song to play, but labor day is also good, but fadder is the most fun to play. I like waste me also, because it sounded like complete garbage when we first wrote and recorded it, cause we never got the sound right, but it's a lot better now. I guess I don’t really have a favorite.


What's your most memorable moment?

Andrew Brauer: Oh gosh, I think recording my solo in labor day, I did 4 takes over like 3 days of it and I could never get the sound right and then finally, I did and I just took my guitar off and took a sigh of relief.

Sam Klos: There's one song on our album and there's a part of the song where there's a big pause. So whenever we play it we all pause and then right before we start playing again we try jumping up and landing on the first note. Every time that comes up in a live show is amazing, last time we did it we all really nailed it and it looked cool from where I was so im guessing the crowd loved it.

Jack Hoover: I recorded the demos for this album and I recorded the one for Piece Of You and that's number 9 on the album, and the guys heard it and brian was like, “sounds good dude”, and that's rare because brian is a pretty taciturn kind of guy, he's the drummer, so that was pretty great that he said that.


The Runnings Youngs new album drops on Friday October 16th, get a first look at the album with a special access song the band has given me to share with you. Plug in your headphones, kick back, and rock out to Fader. Article by Karlie Sherwood Music and Image by The Running Young's



The Running Young's


Like a modern version of the beloved band Blink-182, The Running Young's first and newest album Don’t Go Away show cases the many talents of the five 20 some year olds who have been rocking out since they were adolescents. Sam Klos, Jack Hoover, and Andrew Brauer answer some questions for me about the new album and what's it like to be up and coming rock stars.

How long have you been a band?

Sam Klos: Probably since 8th grade. Were different pieces of different bands but the main structure comes from the 8th grade group, but me and Jack are originals.

Andrew Brauer: I was in a rival band at the time, along with our drummer Brian. It was the same kind of music, and we performed at a competition together and that's how we got to know Jack and Sam.


What instruments do you play?

Jack Hoover: I am the guitarist and bassist depending on who wrote the song, me an Sam switch around.

Andrew Brauer: I play guitar, and sometimes shout vocals.

Sam Klos: Brian Oliverio is our drummer and Zach McCarter does keyboard


How did you come up with your band name?

Sam Klos: I know we wanted running in it and I know that Jack was really into neil young at the time. So It all kind of fell into place ending with being the running youngs.


Could you tell me about your new album?

Sam Klos: A lot of bands will collect money go to a studio or something like that but we being college kids, we don't have that kind of money. So we wrote all of our music. Were really happy with it. I took 2 classes at schoolcraft college just for digital recording and stuff. We have just a little experience but it was all really just a work in progress, a experiment. we nearly finished recording it the first time and we hated it. so we scratched it all and started up again. It went by a lot after but there were feuds. but it came together and we are really proud of it.


What's your favorite song on the new album?

Sam Klos: I wrote a song called how to get burned it’s about how first love at age 16 and how that starts and ends and how you get thru it. That's the first song we really all wrote together in the same room so it's really meaningful for us.

Jack Hoover: Faders my favorite, mostly because me and Jack got to write it together

Andrew Brauer: Jessie, it’s the best song to play, but labor day is also good, but fadder is the most fun to play. I like waste me also, because it sounded like complete garbage when we first wrote and recorded it, cause we never got the sound right, but it's a lot better now. I guess I don’t really have a favorite.


What's your most memorable moment?

Andrew Brauer: Oh gosh, I think recording my solo in labor day, I did 4 takes over like 3 days of it and I could never get the sound right and then finally, I did and I just took my guitar off and took a sigh of relief.

Sam Klos: There's one song on our album and there's a part of the song where there's a big pause. So whenever we play it we all pause and then right before we start playing again we try jumping up and landing on the first note. Every time that comes up in a live show is amazing, last time we did it we all really nailed it and it looked cool from where I was so im guessing the crowd loved it.

Jack Hoover: I recorded the demos for this album and I recorded the one for Piece Of You and that's number 9 on the album, and the guys heard it and brian was like, “sounds good dude”, and that's rare because brian is a pretty taciturn kind of guy, he's the drummer, so that was pretty great that he said that.


The Runnings Youngs new album drops on Friday October 16th, get a first look at the album with a special access song the band has given me to share with you. Plug in your headphones, kick back, and rock out to Fader. Article by Karlie Sherwood Music and Image by The Running Young's

Birmingham Teachers Take to the Streets

Over 200 teachers, secretaries, and paraprofessionals from the Birmingham district and surrounding areas rallied together to picket outside of the BPS Administration building on 13 Mile road and Evergreen on September 29, starting at 6:15 P.M. Since June 30, the contract that defined various crucial conditions such as salary and benefits, had expired, resulting in a $150 to $200 reduction per paycheck.
                                                                                                                                                 BPS staff members picketing for the Administration  to ratify a new contract in front of the administration building on September 29.

                Armed with protest signs and chants of “SAY IT LOUD, SAY IT PROUD! WE WANT A CONTRACT!” these staff members got the attention of the district board and passing traffic.

According to the president of the Birmingham Education Association and one of the leaders of the rally, Scott Warrow, this protest influenced the administration come to an immediate decision after months of bargaining.                                                                       

Just after the administration’s district attorney accepted the mediated offer, Birmingham staff members and other allies celebrated and expressed their support on September 29.

"We’re happy that the board accepted our last proposal. We weren’t sure whether they were going to do that. They had rejected nine of them before this, so we finally got it [an agreement] done,” Warrow said. “It was disappointing and not a good sign of faith for the 800 employees of the district that the administration kept postponing bargaining. We asked to bargain in September, and they didn’t come to the table in April. We would’ve had it [the contract] settled sometime in the spring if we had started earlier. It takes a long time to negotiate these things, so it’s important to start earlier, and I hope they learned from this.”
                                                       

English and social studies teacher at Groves, and president of the Birmingham Education Association, Scott Warrow, rallies troops of teachers, secretaries, and paraprofessionals on September 29. The quote of from the president of the Board of Education Robert Lawrence on Warrow’s sign illustrates the irony staff members felt from administrative praise yet being denied a contract.

                In response to Warrow’s statement, Superintendent of the Birmingham School District Dr. Daniel Nerad stated that more meetings took place and that the root of the issues is tied back to state government.

                “I’m pretty safe to say that there were at least twenty [meetings], so there was an extensive amount of meeting and negotiating,” Nerad said. “We have to make sure we have enough resources to make it for the long haul. We have a $25 increase per pupil from the state, and that doesn’t keep up with our costs. There’s been a combined strategy and that is maintaining programs and class sizes, but every year we use what is called ‘fund equity’. We’ve been using fund equity, and we’ve had a deficit budget for a number of years. This is not sustainable for the long haul. Once the fund equity is gone, it’s gone,” Nerad said. “We’re going to continue to work, the board and the administration that is, to have this dual focus. One on insuring that, within our resources, we can provide fair compensation towards our staff. Second thing is that we do have to live within our means. We have to use fund equity which is not a sustainable practice; it’s viewed as a ‘rainy-day fund’, so if you spend it too quickly or all in one day, it’s hard to look towards another day.”                                                                                                                         

MEA members representing Berkley, Bloomfield Hills, Troy, Utica, Novi, Northville, Utica, Warren, and Royal Oak, including the Vice President of the MEA, rally on September 29 in support of a contract for BPS teachers, paraprofessionals, and secretaries.

Article and photos by Christian Zeitvogel

COMMUNITY RALLYS AT TREVOR PALOOZA TO RAISE MONEY FOR SULLIVAN AND FAMILY

Local community member Marie Watson held an event to raise awareness for freshman Trevor Sullivan and his need for a heart transplant on Sunday, September 20 at the Southfield Municipal. Last year Sullivan was diagnosed with severe heart failure meaning that one of the valves in his heart malfunctions, causing blood to constantly flow into the heart.  This will ultimately lead to extreme swelling of the organ. The heart transplant has many potential medical complications and can cost around one million dollars according to the National Foundation for Transplants. Trevor Palooza helped to raise money for Sullivan’s procedure, hospital fees, and the family’s hotel fees. The event offered food, clowns, magicians, and live music. Sullivan’s doctors did not permit him to leave the hospital for his event; however, the event still went on and had a large turnout in support for his cause. 

Article and photo by Eric Gaines


Nor McIntyre, the lead singer of Moonshine Stew, performing at Trevor Palooza on Sunday, September 20 to help support the Sullivan family. “The Sullivan’s always gave back to the community, so I decide to give back too.”





SHOULD FALCON FAMILY FRIDAY STAY OR SHOULD IT GO?

Falcon Family Friday debuted to the school on September 11. Opinions on this change to our relatively consistent school day were all over the place--to say the least. Family Friday is a closed lunch that is expected to happen repeatedly throughout the year and feature games such as corn hole, pingpong, and more. 
Now that we’re a few weeks into the school year, everything hangs in the balance. Students are wondering whether Falcon Family Friday will be coming back and how often if so. 
We asked students if they thought Falcon Family Friday was a good thing and whether they were for or against it. The votes swayed to the side of Falcon Family Friday continuing with 17 of 20 people saying they enjoyed it and 3 of the 20 saying that they did not want Falcon Family Friday’s to continue. 
My thoughts personally are that Family Friday should stay around for a few reasons. First of all, I think this type of activity can help freshman to feel more welcome to Groves. Next, I think that it can be fun to see your "boring" teacher playing the guitar or trivia games. It can really help connections in the school. Falcon Family Friday has many activities for you to do with friends at lunchtime. I think we've all been at the point where everyone has finished their lunch and is on their phone killing time. I genuinely believe Falcon Family Friday has almost nothing wrong with it; the only thing that seems to make older students not like Family Friday is closed lunch. The thing with that though is closed lunch happens to be Falcon Family Fridays driving force. It allows everyone to get together and have fun. If everyone was allowed to eat out, we would have no one for games. Overall, I think Falcon Family Friday works when us students actually try to make an effort, and it should come back sometime soon.

Article by Connor Mason 



MICHIGAN MAKES SWITCH FROM ACT TO SAT

With Michigan shifting from the traditional ACT exam to the SAT as the primary standardized test for juniors, teachers and students have expressed their concerns about this change and how it could affect students’ chances of getting into college.
  Guidance counselor Norman Hurns compared the shift of the SAT to buying a new model car.
“You don’t necessarily want to immediately buy the new model, but wait a year for manufacturers to work out the kinks and minor issues with the new car,” Hurns said.
While guidance and counseling department head Lezah Phillips understands this concern, she feels that students can make the switch with few problems. Not only did she clarify some of the changes in the re-designed test, she discussed why the test changed, how the change will affect students who will take this assessment, and unique and helpful ways to prepare students for the new test. 
Lezah Phillips: “While the SAT has been redesigned, there are some things that are similar to the ACT. For example, the SAT used to penalize students for guessing on questions. However, in the ACT, students were never penalized for guessing; and now, the SAT is following that same frame of not being penalized for guessing.”
Christian Zeitvogel: “Is it still the same scoring system as it was before hand?”
LP: “Yes. It is still based on the point system that ranges from 200-800 points in each category of the exam that is then tallied up and equated to give you your final scores. It also still includes the essay that is graded on a scale of one to six.”
CZ: “With this new change, how will it affect how colleges accept students into colleges? Will it make it easier or harder, or will there be no difference?”
LP: “I don’t think there’ll be a difference.”
CZ: “No?”
LP: “Nope. The shift in the SAT has been widely accepted by colleges; meaning the change shouldn’t really alter students’ probability of being accepted into universities. I think that a lot of people have concerns that in the Midwest most colleges will only accept the ACT, so most students have taken the ACT for years. But, all schools will accept the SAT. So it’s a concern, but it’s not a necessary a big  concern because a lot of colleges are familiar with the SAT. As a matter of fact, someone from the college board, the producers of the ACT, have actually gone and talked to every admissions board, and every president of the two- year  and four-year-colleges in Michigan to address any concerns that they may have.”
CZ: “Is it just Michigan that is making this change? Or is the whole country doing this too?”
LP: “We have for our state test: the MME, which is the Michigan Merit Exam. It’s a three part testing. One part is a college entrance exam. Another part is the work keys. The third part is the Michigan assessment portion of the test which has been computerized starting last year. So, pretty much the ACT and the SAT sent their lobbyist to Lansing and the SAT gave the better deal, so that’s who they went with at the end of the day.”
CZ: “Lastly, with this new test, do you have any suggestions or advice for students on how to prepare for it?”
LP: “My strongest suggestion would be to go to SAT. They have partnered with Khan Academy. You can complete the profile, and you can complete a pre-test type of situation that last about ten minutes in each category. Khan Academy and the College Board have partnered, and, if you go onto Khan Academy, you can do a thirty minute diagnostic with ten questions in each subject. Then it’ll create your own focus practice for each student, so it’s not just a broad survey; it’s customized for you. As you complete that, you can take four actual re-designed practice tests, and then you can take an official test. Then Khan Academy will take that test will look at it, score it, and re-design it for what you need to do even better. Then the other thing that I think is awesome is that it will also allow you to write your essay on Khan and receive feedback. So, I think that’s huge for students. It’s free. There’s no reason not to do it. All of the practice sessions are designed to last no longer than thirty minutes. So, I think that’s an awesome part about this change.”
CZ: “You said this is all online?”
LP: “Yes, It’s online.”
CZ: “Where can you find it?”
LP: “If you go to the College Board, it’ll have a link to Khan Academy. You should be able to look it up, and create a profile on Khan Academy.”
CZ: “Is there anything else that you think might be worthwhile mentioning about this new exam.”
LP: “Yes, on October 14, all juniors will have the opportunity to take the PSAT, and the PSAT is really a pre-SAT and about ten weeks after you take it, you’ll get your scores back. You’ll get a score report, and it’ll have your questions, feedback, your scores, how you’ll do in comparison to the SAT. This is another great tool to prepare yourself. The district is paying for every student to take the PSAT. I think if students take advantage of all these opportunities, and take them seriously, we should have really good scores on the SAT and it should not be a huge change with the shift from ACT to SAT.”

Article by Christian Zeitvogel 


GROVES TENNIS TEAM VICTORIOUS OVER SEAHOLM FOR SECOND TIME
The scorching hot sun was particularly persistent mid-afternoon on September 21. It was the second home match against Seaholm, and I had braved the heat and humidity to watch Groves annihilate their sworn rivals.... for the second time. There were lots of matches going on at the same time; there was never a dull moment. I was not disappointed. We won 6-3, taking home first place in most of the individual tennis matches.

Article and photos by Fayth Kakos

Nothing could break senior Blake Small's concentration as he prepared to return the ball in the doubles match against Seaholm on September 21.


Senior Deon Griffin leaps towards the ball, delivering a harsh return to the Seaholm players in his doubles match against Seaholm on September 21.  


Freshman Gabe Liss slams the ball back to his Seaholm opponent in his singles match on September 21.  




MEA MEMBERS RALLY ON IN SUPPORT OF A CONTRACT FOR BPS TEACHERS, PARAPROFESSIONALS, AND SECRETARIES 

“Why are we marching in circles?” Seaholm English teacher Jane LaBond’s son asked her.
“So mommy can provide for our family,” LaBond said.

The above conversation took place at the Birmingham Education Association (BEA) protest outside of the administration building on September 29th regarding teachers, paraprofessionals, and secretaries working without contracts for nearly a month despite bringing economic proposals to the meetings with the administration.  
LaBond explained how this uncertainty has impacted her family.

“My kids aren’t able to do some of the things that they would really like to do, like martial arts or participate in other after school activities, because money is just too tight right now,” LaBond said. “Without knowing what my salary will be, I can’t decide what activities we can afford, especially if a financial emergency comes up.”​

    The following is video footage of secretaries, paraprofessionals, and teachers from BPS, other Oakland County schools, and MEA vice president rallying in support of an equitable contract on September 29 in front of the Administration Building.



Article and video by Omar Mitchell
WHAT'S WITH TRUMP?




Video by Ross House



GROVES GATORS REACH TOP TEN IN THE STATE AFTER AT HOME TOURNAMENT

In the third tournament of the season, varsity water polo played against Pioneer and Seaholm at home on September 25 and 26. The varsity team was victorious against Seaholm with a score of 12-2 and neared victory against Pioneer with a 10-9 score in favor of Pioneer.

Article and photos by Ali Abdalla


Junior varsity player Youssef Abdalla prepares to fire a shot just as one of Seaholm’s players grabs on to him on September 26.


Senior varsity player George Googasion gets ready to shoot as Seaholm’s defense closes in on him on September 26.


Senior varsity player Vincent Weber tries to find hole in Pioneers defense to take a shot September 25.

Sophomore varsity player Patrick Seidel gets high out of the water as he attempts to prevent a goal.





Groves PINK OUT SOCCER Promo

Join Groves Soccer on Tuesday October 13, 2015 for our 1st ANNUAL PINK OUT SOCCER GAME!!

Posted by Groves Soccer Team on Tuesday, September 29, 2015





AN OPEN LETTER TO COLLEGE APPLICATIONS

Dear College Apps,
Just about every PG-13 movie ever has suggested that senior year is all about legendary adventure and epic romance. I’m talking to you, Cinderella Story. I like you, Hilary Duff, and it sucks that you have an evil stepmother and have to work in a diner, but your senior year ended in a very impractical romantic gesture by Chad Michael Murray mid-football game. And it was raining. And THEN, you and Chad ran off to Princeton together because THAT happens. It makes a good motion picture, but it also got my vision of senior year to involve a masquerade ball and secret admirer--and let me tell you, that is just not in the cards. 
Instead, us seniors are mid-love affair with ye old college applications. Oh, college applications, you are the bane of my existence. Who doesn’t love filling out information about their family’s educational history and writing essays about why you want to go to said school? (Real reasons: in state tuition and a nice mix of party and study?) Actually, I appreciate the process. It’s definitely an exciting step towards the future and such, but for right now, college applications are driving me nuts. I can’t wait to send them off into the worldwide web, so someone can read them. Then maybe I’ll drive off one day to Whatever University with Lucas from One Tree Hill, and it’ll be awesome.
Love, 
Emily Stillman


FORD RETURNS TO JV FOOTBALL HELPING TO LEAD TEAM TO 62-0 VICTORY OVER HAZEL PARK

JV football’s fourth game this season was also sophomore running back Chaise Ford’s first of the season. He decided after a short break from football to return, and promised we would not regret it. 
Clearly he was right. 
In the first play of the game, sophomore Colton Tinsley handed him the ball near the 50-yard-line, and Ford took it for a touchdown. His carries helped lead Groves JV football to a 62-0 win over Hazel Park. 

Article by Connor Bradbury
Photos by Janet Moore

Sophomore JV running back Chaise Ford takes his first carry for a touchdown in his first game back this season on September 24, a game where he helped his team defeat Hazel park by 62-0.

Sophomore JV running back Chaise Ford visualizes his role as running back before the game against Hazel Park on September 24.
Sophomore JV running back Chaise Ford hurdles a Hazel Park defender, scoring his second touchdown of the game on September 24. 





CHILL ON THE HILL

For the past two years I have celebrated the first weekend of school by attending Chill on the Hill, a two day music festival that takes place at freedom hill in Sterling Heights, MI. Featuring over 20 bands, some local bands like Dale Edherat Jr. Jr., We Came As Romans, and Five Hundredth Year along with some not so local, Panic! at the Disco, Arkells, Civil Twilight, Robert Delong, X Ambassadors, The Struts, Cold War Kids, Coheed and Cambria, Cage the Elephant, Kaleido, Coleman Hell, Vinyl Theatre, The Wombats, Thousand Foot Krutch, Andrew Mcmahon, Beartooth, and Weezer. I’ll be away at school new year but I plan on making the drive back to spend the weeknd having fun with friends, eating weird carnival food and listening to some amazing music. 

Article and photos by Karlie Sherwood


We Came As Romans bassists Andy Glass joins in on the screaming in there new song "Regenerate" at Chill on the Hill on September 12. 

Lead singer of Civil Twilight Steven McKeller performs "Letters From the Sky" at Chill on the Hill on September 13.
Panic! at the Disco opens up there show the night of September 12 at Chill on the Hill with bright colored lights and a high note from lead singer Brendon Urie.




US WOMEN'S SOCCER TEAM BRINGS VICTORY TOUR TO FORD FIELD

The US Women’s soccer team brought their Victory Tour to Ford Field and played against Haiti on September 17.  The crowd brought an energy like none that Ford Field had ever seen. This was the largest attendance for a soccer game at the stadium.  Miniature soccer fans sporting Alex Morgan and Abby Wambach jerseys clung to their parents with faces full of excitement.  The US won 5-0 with the majority of the goals scored by fan favorite Carli Lloyd.   

Article and video by Imani Roberson
 

The US Women’s National Soccer Team played against Haiti on September 17.

Carli Lloyd scored the third goal of the game off a penalty kick in the 37th minute. 



EX-MACHINA

What makes a person a person? This is the major theme of the chilling science fiction thriller Ex Machina. Programmer Caleb (Domhnall Gleeson)  is selected to test whether highly advanced artificial intelligence, Ava (Alicia Vikander) is truly sentient. 
As Ava speaks from her isolated containment center, we gain insight into her discontent with infinite supply of knowledge that she has been programmed to have. For what differentiates a computer from a person, we are later told, is the feeling of having experienced the world. Ava longs to see the world, to observe people of every background going about their daily lives. We are left questioning the humanity of creating artificial life only to keep it imprisoned. What is life without living?
Ex Machina is a thought-provoking glimpse into the sacrifices made for progress. The film’s slow pace, while at times boring, mirrors the way that true advances come to be -- slow-moving, self-contained, and with the knowledge that the stability of containment is but an illusion. 






HOT DOG!

Senior Jason Gross (middle) cooks hot dogs and hamburgers for fellow classmates during lunch on Friday, May 8. He began doing this last year on warm days like the 81 degree day we had on Friday. 
“The reason we did it was to just have some fun; we just wanted to have a party… It kind of just turned into a thing.” Gross said.
This year it has become increasingly more successful and students even pay him two dollars to make their lunch!
“Senior year, gotta go out with a bang, you know?” Gross said when asked why he does this.
It’s a fun time for all and a very exciting way to spend lunch!

Article and photos by Morgan Kreitz



STUDENT SIT IN TO GET THE ATTENTION OF THE ADMINISTRATION TO FIX RACIAL ISSUES

Senior Simone Porter asked the staff planning room filled with students if they felt accepted. An overwhelming amount of people said no. 
A sit in that took place the morning of May 5 in order to draw attention to issues in our school especially those regarding race. Acceptance seems to be a key issue that has finally broken the surface and evoked great amounts of conversation between both administration and students after a racist tweet sparked controversy on the night of May 3. 
Junior Te’lor McCleary told the crowd about how she felt to have everyone in a classroom partner up, and for the three black girls--including herself--all to end up together because none of the white kids want to be in the group with them. Principal Cathy Hurley talked with the approximately 65 students in the room of both black and white students about how not everyone understands what it feels like to be in their shoes, that students may not realize that this situation occurs or that it’s hurtful. Hurley discussed a sensitivity training program that would take place in small group discussion to help with diversity acceptance issues, offered students the chance to be on committees to assist the school in coming up with solutions for how the school shows acceptance for everyone, and extended the opportunity to further discussion with individual administrators and counselors. Hurley said that the school will be working to address the issues discussed in today’s sit in. 
Junior Ariana Reamey summed up feelings of students about a lack of acceptance despite diversity within Groves in a sentence. 
“Just because this school has diversity doesn’t mean it’s diverse.”
Hurley sent out an email to the staff after the sit in discussion. The following is an excerpt from that email which discussed both the investigation into the tweet that sparked much student uproar and what the future will hold as it pertained to race and diversity issues. 
“Our students want a voice. Our students want our attention. Our students need our care. I have had individual discussions with students and they are ready to move to the next phase, which is re-education and awareness of the issues facing our African-American students.  The students have asked that I provide an opportunity for 5 or 6 of them to ‘tell their story’ so teachers have an understanding of how it feels like to be an African-American student in this building.  Some find it difficult, others do not.  Their purpose is ‘we need to know our teachers are our allies, it will make our lives easier.’ I am pleased that students feel teachers are who can make a major difference and provide them the security they need.  This needs forum needs more planning but I am willing to provide this opportunity for them.”
Hurley’s email also that a similar discussion took place at the beginning of the academic year for Seaholm’s students. The push for this dialogue between students and teachers was brought up during the sit in because Seaholm students felt validated afterward.
The sit in and discussions with administration could lead to changes within the school such as celebrating black history and culture in the same way the GSA sponsors LGBTQ awareness over a period of time and changing the way we observe MLK Day as a school. Overall, the biggest change that is trying to be achieved is an overall awareness and sensitivity to racial and diversity issues.  

Article by Ava Scott
Photos by Haley Werthmann

Photos above are taken from various angles of the student that took place in the staff planning room on May 5. Students have hands raised to get the attention of principal Cathy Hurley to discuss their views and ideas for implementing change in the future.



STUDENTS PARTICIPATE IN LOCAL PROTEST

After participating in Protest Bloomfield--which took place April 17, junior Paige White discussed what . 

“Well pretty much we were standing in front of the middle school, holding signs out, you know 'Honk for justice.' There were a lot of people that would just drive past us, and there were a lot of people who shout 'Get a job' and just really awful stuff. People would ignore us, and we’d see people that we knew driving by there, and they would literally pretend that they didn’t see us.  And so the whole thing, there were a lot of people who were positive about it and were saying what you guys are doing is great, but there was also a lot of negativity back at us. 

“I think it’s important because a lot of times in our community we think that things in Ferguson and Baltimore they don’t happen here with us, but they really do, and I think that an event like this sort of brings it closer to home, and I think it’s important that we don’t overlook this as a community.  Because too often we do, and these things go unnoticed and un-talked about. This continues this internalized stuff that we have about it, and we just don’t talk about it.  

“I’m in AACT, and we talk a lot about stuff that happens on social media, and there are people here who send racist tweets out; there have been some really recently that have happened, and I think we’re not talking about it as a school, and things are being overlooked by administration, and so there really isn’t a punishment for it so people feel like they can get away with it, and they think it’s okay.  Students obviously tweet back at them like 'That’s not okay. You’re an idiot. What are you doing?' but then there’s no punishment for it. It’s just kids yelling at you, so your peers yelling at you isn’t going to have that much of an effect on you. The lack of real punishment is why I believe that people feel okay tweeting these things.” 

Interview and photos by Imani Roberson

Below are photos of African Americans Changing Tomorrow (AACT) and various diversity clubs across the community join together in support of Phoenix Williams who was racially bullied on a Bloomfield school bus. 

Photos by Imani Roberson


EMOTIONAL GPAC SENIOR CIRCLE BRINGS CAST OF GOING OUT WITH A BANG! TO TEARS

Senior circle: a very unfamiliar term for those not involved in the Groves Performing Arts Company (GPAC). After the final performance of the original play
Going Out With a Bang!, the cast gathered at senior Amira Kamoo’s house. Celebrating the end of the theatre season, and with the excitement of the revealing of the fall musical Grease, the seniors gathered in a circle on the floor of Kamoo's basement. With the rest of the cast on the outside, each senior shared their memories and intimate moments with the GPAC family they’d formed over their four years at Groves. The realization set in that they would all be going to different schools next year, and it brought tears to their eyes. Passing around a box of tissues, junior Haley West sobbed, mascara streaming down her face. The bond formed between actors and techies alike among the four grades is like no other. GPAC director John Rutherford referred to GPAC as a spirit, one that stays with you forever. Hearing the stories from that circle was touching. It’s amazing how each and every one of the seniors had faced and overcome obstacles with the support of the theatre people around them. As the last senior told her story, the outskirts of the circle became a teary mess. Freshman, sophomores, and juniors all watched and listened to the seniors. Those who they’d all become close with were leaving but moving on to bigger and better things. As everyone hugged and cried, Kamoo’s basement turned into a sauna of sweaty tears. It became obvious that the people in the basement didn't make up just a company; this was a family. 

Article by
Haley Werthmann
Photos courtesy
Anna Daugherty


Scott (played by junior David Pirog) fires off a confetti cannon to assist TJ (played by sophomore Marshall Ross) in asking Grace (played by sophomore Casey Sherwood) to prom in the first scene of
Going Out With a Bang!. 


Seniors Anna Daugherty and Carly Stern. Daugherty will be furthering her love for the theatre by attending Texas State University to receive her BFA in Musical Theatre. Stern will be doing the same by attending New York University in the Strasberg Studio.


STUDENT SPEND HOURS WITH THEIR HAND ON SCHOOL BUS TO WIN PARTY BUS

Groves student Congress sponsored Touch a Bus on Sunday, April 26 from 12pm-5pm. The winner of the event was to receive a free party bus for their group for prom or prom tickets. The premise of the event was simple: one who touches the bus the longest wins a party bus and second place person wins two free prom tickets. While the students are touching the bus, their opponents can do anything to try and get them to take their hand off the bus. Examples of strategies include dumping huge amounts of cold water on others. Once a majority of people were out, the event coordinators had to do other thing to make it harder to want to stay with the bus. The winner of the event was senior Sarah Fried--who won the party bus. The second place winner, was Senior Maggie Hammond, and she got two free prom tickets. 

Article and photos by
Brooke Tushman


Senior Katherine Maholtra brings senior Sarah Fried food so she doesn’t have to leave the bus. 


Junior Hadrien Ovize, senior Remy Combs, senior Taylor Budnar, and junior Jasmine Jordan stand along the bus in the cool puddles of water and under the warm sun.


Senior Zach Van Faussien pours a bucket of water on sophomore Andrew Saad in attempt to get him off the bus. 


FORENSIC TEAM WINS BIG AT MSCI STATE FESTIVAL

This past weekend, on March 28, the Groves Forensic team competed in the MSCI State Festival at Novi High School in many different categories. The team, coached by theatre director John Rutherford and English teacher Haley Kennedy, went away with 22 awards that day. The competition lasted a grueling twelve hours, starting from 7 in the morning and not ending until 7 at night. Groves experienced great successes in both the novice and open divisions.  In the novice tournament 8 entries placed, and for the open tournament 12 entries placed. The team is utterly dedicated to not only their own successes but also to that of their teammates. While they nervously await their scores, they are always having fun and cheering each other on.

Article and photos by Fayth Kakos

Juniors Rebekah Hafen and Morgan Mattler nervously await the results of the tournament.
 Junior Rebekah Hafen, Senior Rafey Rehman, and Sophomore Ryan Larson joke around while they wait for postings.



RUSTIE CONCERT REVIEW

Rustie performed an electrifying set on January 10 at the Majestic Music Theater in downtown Detroit. Rustie, usually a music producer for rappers like Danny Brown, performed a collection heavy trap beats, synth based EDM, and hardcore hip-hop that all seemed to flow into each other seamlessly. Although waiting through the under experienced house DJs that opened for Rustie might have been one of the most painful experiences of my life, the high energy performance from Rustie made the $12 to get into the show more than worth it. Rustie is the perfect artist to see if your looking to have an extremely fun time for a small amount of money; his songs are accessible to people who may not even be fond of EDM and trap because of their melodic synth patterns without the annoying and repetitive samples that EDM has become infamous for. 

Article and photos by
Ethan Lockwood


Rustie preforms "Dope Song", a song he produced for Detroit rapper Danny Brown, on January 10 at the Majestic Music Theater.


Rustie preforms trap influenced song "Slasher" on January 10 at the Majestic Music Theater.



ECONOMICS AND JAPANESE CLASSES GET EDUCATED BY SPECIAL GUEST

Sensei Harumi Copper grasped the opportunity to bring in an influential speaker for the Japanese and economics classes. Mr. Noda, the Deputy General Consulate of Japan, covered things such as general affairs between Japan and America as well as Japanese culture, programs that give students the chance to study abroad in Japan, and a bit of the language. He taught the words “east” and “shame” and showed the symbols in Japanese. Students got the chance to listen to the differences between Japanese culture and ours. Their technological advances really intrigued many in the audience; from the new Disney animation film coming out to their transportation systems, this pioneering technology amazed students. The audience followed along with a packet that featured an anime Japanese pop booklet, a food booklet with traditional Japanese foods, and the Jet program. The Jet program promotes internationalization and opens opportunities between Japan and the rest of the world. Coming prepared with a few packets for each student, Noda gave his speech with confidence despite the language barrier. 

Photo and article by Emma Mullen




THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING

Telling the Story of Stephen Hawking’s life, this typical biopic was not so typical but beautifully different. Stephen Hawking, played by Eddie Redmayne, was a young boy studying at the University of Oxford hoping to become well rounded in scientific theories and cosmology. However one day, after tripping and falling, he discovered from medical testing that he had a life changing disease – ALS (or Lou Gehrig’s disease). They told him he would lose the ability to function properly, with loss of all movement of his body completely. He had 2 years to live.
  It was however, said that his brain would still function properly even though all other movement was lost. Good news to Hawking; he would not let his disease slow him down. He became the first to develop vast ideas on general relativity theories, black hole radiation, and quantum mechanics all whilst having this deadly disease. Still alive today he proved doctors wrong; he is was and still is able to share his wisdom and intellect into the world in a very unconventional way. 
In physical terms alone, Redmayne’s transformation into Stephen Hawking was something remarkable. Every slight hand movement was amplified to show how this disease really affected his gestures and posture, and his facial expression showed great reactions. I still remember his huge green eyes with all their emotion. When he found out he had the disease, he sat and cried in a dark room alone in the bathtub. His hands were shaking and he couldn’t speak, and his eyes shown with anguish and regret. It was an unbelievably powerful scene. When he lost the ability to speak, he had to continually use small mouth movements and reflections in his eyes to show emotion and expression. Redmayne himself said he visited clinics and practiced the movements and parts of the disease for 6 months, before diving into the role of the film. The actual voice heard in the film was Hawkings voice himself. The film left me crying all too much, with tragic and solemn moments, to moments of bliss and delight shared throughout. The film left a lasting impression on me, and I would go back to see it again. Redmayne was positively stellar, and a great choice to play the role of this renowned character. Intrinsic, intriguing, and inspirational, this film is sure to be a classic.

Article by Bella Gutierrez






"WHALE" YOU GO TO SADIE'S WITH ME?

Students reveal in interviews how they were asked to Sadie's (Snow Ball dance) or how they would ask someone to the dance.  These interviews reveal creative methods for students who might need some last-minute ideas on how to ask their date to the Snow Ball. The answers to these questions from several students are compiled the video below which has a shocking twist. If you plan on asking someone last-minute, these adorable ideas might be helpful.



Article and video by Emma Mullen



"GO TO THE WOOD!"

The screen was illuminated with golden slippers, yellow hair, a white cow, and a red cape.  Music was the primary mode of communication with voices ranging from soprano to bass, and every actor seemed to fit their character perfectly. Rob Marshall’s
Into the Woods was a breathtaking interpretation of Stephen Sondheim’s and James Lapine’s original Broadway production, a take on several popular fairytale stories. A few of the classic fairytales we are all more than familiar with came together to create one big picture that prompts us to ask one question: Does happily ever after really exist?
I would highly recommend going to see this film.  For those of you who are in theatre, have an appreciation for musical performances, or are just looking for a movie that features another flawless Meryl Streep performance, it would be a great idea to go see this movie.  However, I can’t say you would enjoy the film if you aren’t the type of person who enjoys musicals.  Sitting through a movie with lots of singing for a little over two hours may not be the most fun thing for you if you don’t enjoy non-stop music.  Nevertheless, I thought the film was amazing, and I enjoyed the twist it provided to the fairytales we all know and love.

Article by Allegra Picano 



FRENCH LUNCH CUISINE

                                                                  

Look good? For lunch in France they are served full four-course meals. A lot of students enjoy our school lunches, but it doesn’t compare to the fanciness of France. On a regular day, students can receive anything from cabbage and tomato salad to roast beef with potatoes to baked potatoes with herbs to cheese with bread--even a kiwi! One such meal is pictured above. Every meal has a first and main course, accompanied by a side and dessert. Everyone is sat at separate tables, and the head child of the day gets seconds for the tables. They’re served their food at the same time too--no lines!

Article by Taylor Budnar



                                       STUDENTS INSPIRED BY MLK ASSEMBLY

Students appreciated the more interactive nature of this year's MLK assembly on January 14 and shared how we can better include--or  as Langston Hughe's wrote, "invite to the table"--those who may feel voiceless, or marginalized in our school.


Videos by Charlotte Beggs




                         STUDENTS EXPRESS THE IMPORTANCE OF JUSTICE AT MLK ASSEMBLY



               The assembly on Wednesday, January 14 proved influential and inspirational as students shared their stories and poems in relation to Martin Luther King Jr's message that "An injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere". Five students went up to share with the audience their own written works and how they related to the theme of this day.  One student, junior Taylor McCleary, shared a poem she wrote and reached out to counselor Norman Hurns to ask if she could share it in the MLK assembly.

                “What I wanted to say really needed to be said to everyone all around me,” McCleary said. “People may be oblivious to the things that are happening in the news and in cities besides ours; that is why I named my poem.  'It hasn’t happened yet, but why can’t it.'"

Article by Bella Gutierrez

Below is a video of McClearly discussing her inspirations for her speech and why she spoke at the MLK assembly.

Video by Charlotte Beggs



Photos of students who spoke at the MLK assembly below (in order):

Senior Zach VanFaussien spoke about feeling ignorant of the struggles people face who have less advantages than he does as white male in an affluant city and inclusive high school.  He admitted how easy it is to adopt an oblivious attitude, an attitude that assumes because racism, sexism, gender stereotyping, and other forms of exclusion happen so rarely at Groves that it’s not happening at all.

Junior Taylor McCleary read her original poem to the student body to make sure she got her message out that while the types of racial tragedies, such as the killing of Mike Brown and Trayvon Martin, have not happened here, they could if we do not maintain our vigilant support of diversity here.   Junior Lilli Flechsig talked about her personal struggles with prejudice against her because of her sexuality and mental illness.

Junior Katherine Kauffman spoke about how sometimes she sees people in the hallway being bullied and why this upsets her. Her speech served as a reminder to the student body that nobody deserves to be put down and bullied. Every individual deserves the chance to shine despite what others think.

Photos courtesy of Norman Hurns




THE DARKER BROTHER

The assembly about Martin Luther King highlighted the recent events that occurred in Ferguson as well as other places and paralleled this to the violence that occurred in the civil rights movement. The images showed both the hatred and violence towards African Americans, but also Black Excellence by pointing out the many African Americans that contributed to America. These images were accompanied by the joyous song, “American the Beautiful” to create irony. Afterwards, students read Langston Hughes’ poem, “I, Too, Sing America” and reflected on it in their classrooms. In this poem Hughes writes “I am the darker brother/ They send me to eat in the kitchen/ when company comes…” Students conversed about who the “darker brother” may be at Groves. Some groups in our society discussed in my second hour were people with mental health problems and people with lower socioeconomic status that may be marginalized.

People with mental health issues such as anxiety, depression, ADHD, and other problems are looked over and swept under the rug. Some teachers expect all students to learn at the same pace and don’t realize that some people physiologically can’t do that. With piles of homework and tests coming up, students have high levels of stress and their anxiety can increase, but people aren’t aware of this and don’t consider that these are real problems because their depression or other problems aren’t shown on the outside- it’s a problem with the brain. These people may feel invisible, and they may not want to tell their teachers they have a problem because it’s considered embarrassing by society.

This is the same with people with low socioeconomic status may also be disregarded because they aren’t wearing the same clothes as everyone else- their leggings aren’t from Lululemon, their coats aren’t from the North Face, and they aren’t wearing Uggs. These people at Groves may not feel welcome, and it’s important that we learn to accept people for who they are regardless of race, socioeconomic status, or mental health issues. This way they’ll “be at the table/ when company comes,” and we can all see how beautiful we all are as Hughes said in his poem. 


Article by Mehak Ahmed


MOCKING JAY - PART 1 MOVIE REVIEW

            In The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1, Katniss Everdeen, played byJennifer Lawrence, wrestles with the aftermath of the third quarter quell, while dealing with losing one of her closest friends, Peeta Mellark, (Josh Hutcherson), as a prisoner to the capitol. Her long time friends and mentors Effie Trinket (Elizabeth Banks), Haymitch Abernathy (Woody Harrelson), and Gale Hawthorne (Liam Hemsworth) try to rescue her from the truth of Panam. But, she agrees to become the face of the rebellion against the capitol, creating propaganda to save Peeta.

Although I thought the movie depicted the movie well, there were mistakes. For example, in the book, Effie stayed in the capitol during the entire time Katniss made propaganda. The movie shows Effie in District 13, helping Katniss to become the face of the rebellion. Although this wasn’t originally in the book, I think Effie influenced the film in a positive way.

The book was written in the first person, so it was completely from the perspective of Katniss. As a result, we didn’t get much detail about Peeta’s rescue. The film worked with author Suzanne Collins to give the audience more details on what really happened. Again, although it was not in the book, it was a good addition to the film.

The entire cast of The Hunger Games: Mockingjay- Part 1 did an outstanding job with acting. Jennifer Lawrence depicts the post traumatic stress disordered Katniss perfectly. Katniss was always detached from what was going on. She was never really in the present. It takes a truly talented actress to do that.

In all, I would give the movie nine out of ten. I think the acting and behind the scenes work was phenomenal. Even though the movie did not copy the book exactly, the changes made were a positive influence. I can’t wait for Part 2!

Article by Charlotte Beggs



WHAT GOES ON BEHIND THE SCENES OF A SNOW DAY?

I met with Paul DeAngelis, Deputy Superintendant of Birmingham Public Schools, to talk about what goes on behind the scenes when deciding whether or not to close school for a snow or cold day. We discussed the process the district went through the morning of January 8, which was a potential cold day. 

Charlotte Beggs: How does the district go about deciding if there’s a snow day? What process did you have to go through at 4 o’clock this morning?

Paul DeAngelis: Here’s how the system works. Throughout the course of the day before a snow day, or a cold day like today, [a] meteorologist will provide us updates [on the weather] two or three times throughout the evening. If he’s absolutely certain about the weather at 10 o’clock at night, then we can make a call [to close schools]. At about 4:30 in the morning, between 4:15 and 4:30 typically… all of the superintendents [in Oakland County] call into a conference call, and the meteorologist will then lead the discussion. He’ll say, “Here’s what happening: the Snow Belt moved north, or the Snow Belt didn’t come this far north. You’ve got 4 inches on the ground in South Lion, but you’ve got just a trace of snow in the Birmingham, Royal Oak area.” He’ll give us the most accurate information. We’ll have somebody from our facilities department do a quick tour of the roads, we’ll make sure all the buses are started; we do all those kinds of things on top of just monitoring the weather. So, there’s a lot of moving parts. It’s road conditions, it’s temperature, and it’s when will the roads be better.

CB: What did the meteorologist say this morning, [January 8]?

PD: When [Dr. Nerad] got on the call this morning, what [the meteorologist] said is that the temperatures are no different than they were yesterday morning, we don’t anticipate the wind picking up all that much, it’s going to be cold, and the actual temperature is colder than it was yesterday morning. The wind chill is not going to be anything different from what it was yesterday morning.

CB: Why did other school districts in Oakland County cancel, while Birmingham stayed open?

PD: Lavonia, Plymouth, Canton, Northville, and Farmington; that whole pocket canceled last night [due to the wind chill advisory]. So, Clarencville went out this morning because they were surrounded by everybody who was out, so they’re kind of stuck. But everybody else stayed in. Everybody else who was on that call across the board stayed in.

CB: Were there any other influences, for example twitter? Do you listen to that?

PD: No, not really.

CB: Is there a cutoff temperature for school to be canceled?

PD: Nope. Not for school closing. In the state of Michigan, we don’t move into a warning on wind chill. We don’t go on wind chill [warning] until -35. But some districts say “We will only cancel school if there’s a wind chill warning.” Well that’s not true, because nobody is going to be in school at -35. We’ve never stayed in school at -30. We haven’t stay in school at -25 either. But today was kind of that range. It was like, it could be -12, [or] it could be -25, just depending on the wind. 

CB: What is the limit of snow days in the State of Michigan?

PD: Districts are afforded six days. After six days, the district - or individual schools - must make up the time missed. 

WHAT DO STUDENTS THINK THE CRITERIA OF A SNOW DAY SHOULD BE?

While there is no set criteria that defines whether school should be canceled or not due to weather, students have their own sets of determining factors of when school should and should not be canceled. Below is a video of a handful of student's opinions of what conditions call for a snow day.

Video and interview by Charlotte Beggs




STUDENT TWITTERS FILL WITH LACK OF SNOW DAY SADNESS

Students tweeted out their feelings of frustration, anger, and sadness with sarcastic and humorous tweets because the Birmingham District did not cancel school yesterday, Thursday, January 8. Administrators warned student tweeters who attacked the Birmingham Public Schools twitter page with offensive tweets that such public displays of immaturity is not acceptable and can impact a student's future prospects with schools and employers. In the interest of not perpetuating the profane tweets, we have only published the following satirical posts against the decision to keep school open.

Photos courtesy of
Mehak Ahmed and Isabella Gutierrez





VIRTUES OF A STAYCATION

December break rolls around each year right around that time where we students have almost given up on school, thrown our books in the fireplace, and resigned to a life in our parent’s basement forever. The two weeks or so between Thanksgiving break and December break are strangely exhausting and spirit crushing, particularly for my ACT intoxicated and perpetually anxious junior class. Luckily, the holiday season brings a 17 day escape from school, and this year in particular, I could not have been more thankful for a break.

If you’ve lived in Michigan for a while you know that a mass exodus happens approximately the week before Christmas. People grab their passports, board planes or load their cars, and get the heck out of this snowy tundra. I usually envy the people who have fled to warmer climates like Florida and Fiji and the people on family trips to France or Spain or somewhere equally as cool. But for whatever reason, this year, I was home for all of break with no particular plans, a manageable amount of homework, and a subscription to Netflix; I was overjoyed. I think I was the happiest girl to ever be stranded in the brutal cold, besides maybe Elsa from Frozen.

You see, normally I find myself seething in jealousy over my friends who are drinking virgin margaritas on the beach and will come home in a couple weeks with bronzed faces. This year, while I wouldn’t have been disappointed to take a trip to somewhere warmer than 15 degrees Fahrenheit, home was enough. It was taking a staycation, and it was going to be great. I was so excited to finally have something I’d been fighting for since day one of junior year: time.

At last I had time to run errands, do funny stuff with my friends, and watch absurd amounts of One Tree Hill. I know that all of my friends who stayed home were rarely bored. We all felt some sort of peace in the air. People celebrated the holidays with their families, and the whole city was doused in twinkly lights. It was just an all around good time to lay around and eat Cheez-Its in my bed without feeling bad about it.  I finally had time to read Divergent, re-read my collection of John Green books, and clean my closet. Free time was blissful, and I had missed it dearly.

I only got paler as the days went on, but it was okay. I made my computer screen saver a beach scene and sat on my white down comforter with a Diet Coke instead of a Piña Colada. I had time to sleep and to catch up with my family, and especially, with myself. It was refreshing and exactly what I needed after four months of non-stop craziness at school.

I welcomed in the New Year at home, without a tan or a physical separation from Birmingham. But I still felt renewed, more like myself and ready to face on a new year with two seasons of One Tree Hill under my belt and a recently organized sock drawer.

The weather is pretty brutal, and it’s always nice to get away from home...but still. I wouldn’t trade in my staycation for a vacation. Sometimes all you need is some time to yourself, a box of hot chocolate mix, and a couple of blankets to take a break from the stress of high school, even just for a little while. Time is priceless no matter where you are and what the temperature is, and remember, you’ll at least get a chance stop by CVS and browse through the self-tanner isle.

Article by Emily Stillman
Photo courtesy of Emily Stillman

Juniors Emily Stillman and Blake Small pose for a photo at Campus Martias over winter break.



FAIR-WEATHER FALCON FANS

I woke up last Saturday more excited than usual; Groves was facing off against Berkley in the state playoffs at 1:00. The cold weather didn’t lessen my excitement at all as I drove towards the school to watch my team seek revenge against the Bears. I entered the gates eager to experience some playoff level intensity from the student section.
What I saw fell disappointingly short.
It appeared that there were more Berkley students in the away bleachers than there were Groves students. I honestly couldn’t believe it, especially considering the end result of the game: the first Groves playoff win in ten years. 
Ok, I know it was cold, and I know it was 1:00 on a Saturday… But what are we if we’re only a bunch of fair-weather fans? Now, since Groves still won against Berkley, the effect of a smaller student section was not too great. I’m not sure if the same could be said about the Brother Rice game. Groves lost to the Warriors on November 8, with a weak number of fluctuating students supporting them – many of which left at halftime. 
I know that football games on Fridays are a social as well as a sporting event. I know that we usually give important support on those Friday nights as well. But, our team needs us even more on a cold Saturday in the postseason. When we make the playoffs next year, let’s support our team till the end and be true fans of the game. 

Article by Jack Dolan

GROVES FOOTBALL WINS FIRST PLAYOFF GAME SINCE 2004
On October 10th, we traveled to Hurley Field to face off against Berkley. We were 6-0 at the time and Berkley had just come off their first loss of the season, standing at 5-1. We thought we were just going to show up and beat Berkley…we were wrong. Berkley came to play and they beat us 32-29, scoring a field goal in the final minute of the game and that was our first loss of the season. 
“We were flat in that game,” senior defensive lineman Lenny Trotta said. “We were flat in warm-up and we just weren’t ready to play.”
We  would finish the season 6-3, losing our final three games of the year. On October 26th, we all went to senior offensive lineman Nate Wikol’s house to watch the playoff pairings. We are all expecting to play Brother Rice, players, coaches, and parents were expecting to play Brother Rice. When we saw Brother Rice would be playing a different team in the playoffs, we were so relived. But now we had no clue who we were going to play. Then we saw it…Birmingham Groves will host Berkley in the first round of the playoffs.
“The guys went ballistic. I’m pretty sure the neighbors were wondering why everyone was so loud at the Wikol household,” head coach Brendan Flaherty said.
We practiced all week, Monday-Friday. We practiced in cold weather and there were times when we wanted to go inside because it was so cold. But it was playoff football and we had a chance to get a second shot at the team who ended our undefeated season. We had the best week of practice we ever had all season. We were loud, we were treating every practice like it was a game, and it was win or go home for us…and this time around, we had home field advantage. On November 1st, it was game day. We decided to play the game at 1:00 because we have played 2 early games during the season and we dominated the two teams. When Berkley arrived on our field, the coaches saw the players stomping and spitting on the falcon. When coach Brooks told us that, we were so ready to get some payback. We dominated the Berkley Bears on offense, defense, and special teams. Our offense scored every time they had the ball expect twice: one punt and one lost fumble. Our defense only allowed 2 touchdowns the whole game and other than those two touchdowns, the Berkley offense couldn’t do anything to move the ball on us. We beat Berkley 35-13, giving us our first playoff victory since 2004.
“I am so proud of those guys. They played hard and they really wanted to get the bad taste of losing out of their mouths. We haven’t won in three weeks and we really wanted a victory,” Flaherty said. “My high school football coach, Jim MacDougal sent me an e-mail on Monday and I read the e-mail to my team. The e-mail said ‘Brendan, congratulations on making the playoffs for the second year in a row. I read that you will be playing Berkley and I know that they beat you earlier in the season. I wanted to let you know that you rarely get the chance to get a second chance to beat a team in one season. Good luck!’ That helped motivate the team.”
We will be playing 3 time state champion Brother Rice on November 8th at Hurley field at 1:00. 

Article by
Zac Grasl
 

Sophomore tight end Drew Sheckell dives for the end zone in the first round of the playoffs against Berkley on November 1st. Although Sheckell did not score on this play, his presence was a big part in the 35-13 victory against Berkley, with 3 catches and a catch in the end zone for a two-point conversion. “Before Berkley beat us in week 7, I had won twenty games in a row, going back to my Pop Warner days with the Birmingham Patriots. I wanted payback and it felt great when we beat them to knock them out of the playoffs to end their season,” Sheckell said.



Junior running back CJ Bosewell runs the ball against Berkley on November 1st. Bosewell had two touchdowns against Berkley and helped lead Groves to a 35-13 victory over Berkley in the first round of the playoffs. “It was payback time. They beat us and it was time to beat them,” Bosewell said.


Photo credits to Heather Grasl



SENIORS PROVE POWDERPUFF CHAMPIONS YET AGAIN
The powder puff team from the class of 2015 reigns supreme again. The seniors, the class of 2015, beat the class of 2014 last year when they were juniors, and dominated the football field again against the class of 2016 on October 22. The final score was 33-6. As always-other than the clash of the classes, the halftime show is something that spectators look forward to seeing. The video to the right has the boys poms team’s routine. 




STAFF REFLECTS ON THE MEANING OF ROBIN WILLIAMS’ DEATH AND HOW HE INSPIRED THEIR CAREERS

Social Studies teacher Laura Sheckell
What was your favorite Robin Williams movie, and why? 
I mean there’s so many good ones, going from One Hour Photo—this dark role—to Good Will Hunting and Aladdin. He was just really able to run the gamut. 

Did his passing affect you in any way? 
I think it brings to light how shocked people were of how much people are closed off and still a stigma associated with mental illness, and people who know me, I’m always talking about “stomping out the stigma, stomping out the stigma,”—let’s look at mental health. That’s so important. If we have a mentally healthy society, we’ve got people who are embracing, and the connections that are happening to look out for one another, but yet, even with his high status he was still so closed off. Not to mention, he talked about his addiction. We know that in addiction, people tend to be masking something else and self medicating.


AP Psychology teacher Laura Sheckell reflects upon the aftermath of Robin Williams’ death. “I think it brings to light how shocked people were of how much people are closed off,” Sheckell said. 

Crisis counsellor Sherree Wilson explains the positive that has come out of Robin Williams’ passing. “I think the positive that can come out of that is that it gets people talking. Because, there’s still some stigma attached to mental illnesses, including depression,” Wilson said.

Crisis counselor Sheree Wilson 
What are your thoughts on Robin Williams’ recent passing? 
I think the positive that can come out of that is that it gets people talking. Because, there’s still some stigma attached to mental illnesses, including depression. And it’s like people are supposed to be able to decide, in their minds, that they’re not going to be depressed anymore. “Like okay, I’m not going to be depressed anymore,” and that’s it. The thing is, if you’re suffering from that, you’d do that if you could. The more we talk about it, the more people realize it’s an illness and if you get treatment, you can get better. I think the more that happens, the better. 

Social Studies teacher Jim Sherman
What are your thoughts on Robin Williams? Not his death, but what he’s done. 
What’s interesting is that as a young person, I was greatly influenced by Robin Williams in his show Mork and Mindy, for whatever reason, and what captured me the most about him was that he was so crazy, so quick witted and out there, but he could bring it back in and he seemed really genuine in what he was doing. And that struck me as being unbelievably difficult to do and knowing that everything he did was unscripted, is astonishing. It was that ability to be crazy yet connect and make really important messages was an astonishing thing to be able to do, and that influenced me because I thought, ‘If I could do what he does, that would be incredible.’ When I got involved in things like the theatre, I incorporated some of what I thought was cool that he did in a very minimal matter, but what was kind of cool was the fact that he then proved that he was a real live dramatic actor. It is very difficult to be known as a comedian and then pull off drama. I struggled with that in the theatre myself. I was always known as a funny person for whatever reason, and then when I moved into drama, it was a struggle. For people to see me that way was difficult, and to see someone who was so much funnier, so much more intelligent, so much better of an actor than me to do that seamlessly was inspiring to me. I’ll never climb on my desk, but he was someone that I always followed. Even dumb things, he’s an avid cyclist and I love biking. It’s funny because nothing can be scripted in a classroom. If you do, it’ll get boring and anticipated, but if I come across something that plays in my head that would be funny, but is too crazy to do, I’ll go ahead and do it anyway. I’ll do it to prove a point and that’s what interesting. It’s simple and unplanned, but you go with it because... it’s much more fun.

History teacher Jim Sherman explains how Robin Williams’ work as an actor influences Sherman’s career as a teacher. “It’s funny because nothing can be scripted in a classroom. If you do, it’ll get boring and anticipated but if I come across something that plays in my head that would be funny, but is too crazy to do, I’ll go ahead and do it anyway. I’ll do it to prove a point and that’s what interesting. It’s simple and unplanned, but you go with it because... it’s much more fun,” Sherman said.

English teacher Holly Zimmerman describes how Robin Williams affected her life. “He spoke to so many people on so many levels, and I always felt personally moved by the things he did,” Zimmerman said.

Article and photos by Azra Sharaf
English teacher Mrs. Zimmerman
Did Robin Williams affect your life in any way? 
Robin Williams absolutely affected my life. He spoke to so many people on so many levels, and I always felt personally moved by the things he did. In some ways, I always felt that the movies he made were made for me, and I think everybody kind of felt that way. Especially because I traditionally show Dead Poets Society every year in tenth grade English, it’s hard to decide whether or not that’s something that will be seen as a tribute to him or something to be seen as the opposite, so I’m struggling with whether or not that’s the appropriate thing to do. It’s a wonderful movie and as are many of his movies, they are so complex and they speak to the human experience in a way that I think is unique for that body of work.



VICTORY DAY

Senior offensive lineman Devin Light escorts Brendan Dolan onto the field through a tunnel of cheerleaders for Victory Day on October 8.
Senior fullback Connor Haenni, junior Teddy O’Connor, and head coach Brendan Flaherty run for the end zone on Victory Day on October 8.
Junior quarterback Doug Roch III hands off the ball to Brendan Dolan on October 8.

Photos by Jack Dolan


Senior offensive lineman John Stevens and junior Daniel  Zwierzchowski race for the end zone on Victory Day on October
8.

Senior offensive lineman Devin Light, Brendan Dolan, and junior quarter back Doug Roche III get ready to make a break for the end zone on October 8 for Victory.

Senior offensive lineman John Stevens and junior Daniel Zwierzchowski charge through Seaholm defenders and make a break for the end zone on October 8.




CAN JUNIORS DEFEAT WINNING SENIORS IN THIS YEARS POWDER PUFF GAME?

Juniors Coco Lurz and Julia Dickerson and seniors Cyrelle Wheeler and Andrea MacMicheal talk about the upcoming powder-puff game, juniors versus seniors, on Wednesday, October 22. The juniors have been practicing since October 2 on Thursdays and Sundays for three hours to try to rival the skill of the seniors who practice twice a week for three hours due to the seniors' win last year. Be sure to support Falcon2Falcon-a program that helps struggling families by providing modest resources and volunteer services-and attend the game to see who shall be victorious: the reigning champs, the seniors, or the newbies, the juniors. 

Article and interviews by Audrey Laport and Ariel Boston





                                           BERKLEY ENDS GROVES' UNDEFEATED SEASON


        
It was late in the fourth quarter, and Berkley had just kicked a field goal to put them in the lead 32-29. The Falcons had the ball, and there was just two minutes left on the clock. Groves knew they had to pull off a big play. After driving the ball all the way to around the 50 yard line, senior quarterback Zach Van Faussien threw an interception that would end the game.

The final score of the game versus Berkley was 32-29. The Falcons suffered a loss that would put a halt to the varsity football teams’ undefeated season. Going into the game, Groves knew that it was going to be a tough game with all of the injuries they were suffering. It was a competitive game until the 4th quarter. Both Groves and Berkley were in a fight to gain the lead. Although both teams tried as hard as they could to win, Berkley finished on top.

Article by Zak Abdulwasi




FOOTBALL TEAM HAVING SUCCESSFUL SEASON DESPITE INJURIES

In the season opener against rival school Seaholm on August 29, senior linebacker Kyle Sherman blocked a Seaholm extra point, but at a price. Sherman took a blow to his right knee, and he fell to the ground in pain. Sherman was helped to his feet and was carried to the sideline. Even with the loss of Sherman, the football team went on to defeat Seaholm 42-19. The following week, Sherman and the team found out that he had torn his MCL and needed surgery. However, the loss of Sherman didn’t stop Groves from winning 2 more games. In the 4th game of the year against Pontiac on September 19, sophomore running back Ernest Allen took a hit to the knee on a carry, and he was on the ground in pain. Although Groves would beat Pontiac 57-0, the loss of Allen was a big loss to the team. Allen had sprained his MCL and would be out for 5 weeks.
“I feel fine. I’m not limping anymore, and I haven’t felt any pain in like a week. I feel ready to play now, but the doctor has told me ‘no.’ I guess you always got to do what the doctor ordered,” Allen said.
  Now playing without two of their best players, Groves had to make adjustments at running back. Groves still had junior running back CJ Bosewell, but since he also plays defense, he would need a breather every now and then. So head coach Brendan Flaherty brought up sophomore running back and defensive back Dylan Sutton from the JV team to split carries at running back with Bosewell. The first game without Allen, the Falcons defeated Hazel Park 62-0. Groves football was now 5-0 and one win away from a playoff birth. Groves had their first test of the season against a 3-2 Avondale team. Early in the 2nd quarter, senior defensive lineman Idress Abdul-Wasi took a blow to his knee and limped off the field. The defense had to adjust to the loss of Abdul-Wasi quickly against the fast Avondale offense. Groves would go on to beat Avondale 36-31. Abdul-Wasi and the rest of the team does not know how serious his knee injury is just yet, but Abdul-Wasi is on crutches. The Groves Falcons have battled through injuries all season long, but that hasn’t slowed them down at all. They remain undefeated at 6-0 and will be heading to the playoffs for the 2nd straight season for the first time since 2005.
“Probably what has helped us a lot is that we don’t let the loss of a player get to us very easily,” Flaherty said. “When we lost Kyle in the first week of the year, we were all bummed out about it, but we had to move on without him because we had a whole season in front of us.”

Article by Zac Grasl
Photos courtesy of Zac Grasl



Senior quarterback Zach Van Faussien rolls out of the pocket, looking for an open receiver against Avondale. Groves win with a final score of 36-31 on October 2.



Senior quarterback Zach Van Faussien throws a pass as he is rushed by Avondale defenders on October 2. The game finished with a final score of 36-31 for a Groves victory.



THE GOVERNMENT TOOK AWAY OUR COOKIES

Two years ago, in an attempt to make school lunches healthier, the cookies enjoyed by countless students disappeared from the lunch menu. Petitions were signed and protests were made, but these efforts fell on deaf ears. Now, in another change of lunch policy, students are being charged more for not including fruits or vegetables in their lunch. 

According to Assistant Principle Othamian Peterson, this is due to regulations set by the federal government and to a change in the provider of the school’s lunches. The new provider is a company called Chartwell's, which offered what was considered by a board of reviews to be a better contract than the previous provider: Sodexo. Chart Wells then pointed out that some of Groves’ school lunches did not meet the government definition of a school lunch. The federal government now has standards as to what a school lunch is, involving a certain proportion of vegetables to fruits to protein. Thanks, Michelle. 
The issue with pricing arises when students try to buy a lunch that does not satisfy government regulations. 
“If you go outside of [the government requirements] or you choose to ignore that and take less than that, then they have to reclassify that as a la carte, which means, basically, you’re not getting a school lunch…” Peterson said. 
Because the school lunches are funded by the government, the idea is that the government can decide how those funds are spent. 
“If [the government is] going to pay for it, you have to get a school lunch, which means you have to get fruits, vegetables, in a certain portion,” Peterson said.
While the intent behind this, other than the financial aspect, might be to make lunches healthier, does it go too far? Students pay more because they aren’t buying a school lunch… even though it is lunch… at school. There is no good reason to charge students extra for taking less food unless the goal is to dictate which foods students eat. Though obesity in young people is an issue in today’s America, the responsibility of deciding what students may eat should fall on the parents not policy makers in D.C.

Article by
Jack Dolan




DELICIOUS TREATS FROM THE NEWSROOM

Need a chocolate fix? These fudgy, triple chocolate brownies are just the thing. Easy and delicious, you’ll wish you made two batches of these homemade brownies. Warning: you’ll probably need a glass of cold milk.   

Senior Rebecca Simonov demonstrates how to make homemade brownies in her cooking video. The ingredients are in the info box on YouTube. 



Video by Rebecca Simonov


STUDENTS AND STAFF REACT TO CHANGES IN X-BLOCK


Student and Staff reactions to this year’s new x-blocks schedule, reducing it to only one x block a week on Wednesday  and ending school five minutes later.   Many miss the original schedule of having two x-blocks a week on  Tuesdays and Thursdays, where school started at 8:20 pm on those days and ended at 2:45 pm.

In the following videos, students and staff  explain why they feel we should return to the original schedule and avoid late starts, meetings, or anything else that would eliminate the one Wednesday x-block.

Video by J'Laan Pittman and Ariel Boston




OUT OF THE DARKNESS WALK

With Robin William’s suicide causing emotional tumult in our community, crisis counselor Sheree Wilson shared her thoughts on this event and suicide awareness event: the Out of the Darkness walk.

Ethan Webster: So we’re here to ask you about what students can learn from Robin Williams’s suicide and how people can help if they know someone who is battling depression.
Sheree Wilson: Well, I think the one positive thing that came out of that was it does raise awareness about the idea that there are so many people out there who are dealing with depression or a mental illness that keep it hidden. Somebody like Robin Williams who looked so happy and healthy on the outside but then underneath it all was battling depression and drug use and all that along the way, so if it helps the conversation about depression in particular, but other mental illnesses as well, it can be helpful because really I think it’s something. Something like 80 percent of people who have committed suicide suffered from depression, and it has been proven that therapy works to at least help depression. You know I wouldn’t say cure but help. If some of those people can be more open and seek help, we can take down the numbers. There wouldn’t be as many people attempting. We’re doing a walk for awareness here; I don’t know if you have heard about it.

EW: Yeah. Actually, that’s the next question we have; tell us more about the Out of Darkness Walk. Tell us just a little more about that.
SW: Well, I knew about it last year. We just didn’t get it together in time because it’s hard when things are in September, but, from what I’ve heard about it, you really experience a good feeling. There’s some bonding that goes on in the walk. It’s a positive attitude; it’s not like everyone is in this walk all sad and depressed. People go to walk to raise awareness and raise money, or they go if they’ve been touched by suicide in some way, whether it be they themselves or somebody close to them. I think it’s helpful to be around people who have been through something similar to what you’ve been through, so I’m looking forward to it. I think it’s going to be a good day. There was a student at Seaholm who committed suicide in the summer. She just finished her freshman year at Michigan. She was beautiful, athletic, and popular, and it kind of felt like it came out of the blue for most people that knew her. Through that we were talking, and many of the kids that knew her were really interested in this. There were a couple of teachers who had done it before in New York and had nothing but good things to say, so we decided this would be the perfect year for us to do this.

EW: So have you ever done the walk before?
SW: No, I have not done the walk.

EW: Did anyone who has done it before tell you anything interesting about it?
SW: They said they were a little uneasy about it at first. The particular one I’m thinking of lost her fiancée. It had been four or five year later that she did the walk, but the wounds were still very fresh in a way. She felt really comforted by the people who spoke with her. I think they gave her some kind of beads, but that was the kind of thing that helped her heal after all that time. When she did that walk, it was kind of a turning point for her. I’m thinking it’s going to be a fun day. Actually, here at Groves and at Seaholm, there are many students every year who are there and who either say they’re thinking about it or say they’ve tried something. The majority of the population doesn’t know anything about it. Just the student’s out for a couple days, they’re back, and you don’t really know what’s going on. Really they’re dealing with some pretty hard things. Luckily, usually, they come through. I always say if somebody’s here, I’m happy because that means they’re getting help. Again, the more we talk about it-not that you want to walk around talking about suicide-but the more we talk about the idea that “Hey, if you need help, get it. It’s okay.” Depression isn’t something you can just turn off one day. You can’t just be like “I think I’ll get over this now”. It’s a process, so you need help to get through it, and you can. You guys are under so much pressure-I swear-so much pressure. There’s a lot of stress and anxiety that goes into being a teenager. I imagine there’s fun stuff, too, but it seems like you guys are on 24/7. You feel like you can’t mess up. If I mess up this one little thing, it has huge implications. I’m not going to college, then I’m not going to have the life I want. It all rides on the smallest things. I have people who freak out because they do poorly on a test because now they’re going to get a bad grade in the class, and if they get a bad grade in the class, they’re not going to get into the school of the choice. If they don’t get into their school of choice, they’re not going to get the job they want, and if they don’t get the job they want, they’re just going to be some loser. If you do badly on one test, all of a sudden you’re a loser for the rest of your life, and that’s a lot of pressure to be operating under.



Interview by Ethan Webster
Video by Lilli Flechsig



BOYS TENNIS TEAM IN ACTION

Varsity boys tennis team finishes four to four on September 18. Using the tiebreaker system, Seaholm edged Groves out. With regional state qualifiers on October 9, this match served as a precursor to the intense play of the tournament between the Birmingham rivals. From the first flight to the fifth flight in both singles and doubles, the varsity boys tennis team will be keeping Seaholm on its toes for a spot at states.
Junior number one singles player Blake Small stretches for a backhand on September 18 in a meet at Seaholm.
Small hits a forehand on September 18 in a meet against Seaholm.
McIntyre executes a follow thru after a volley away on September 18 against Seaholm.

Photos by Lilli Flechsig




Junior five doubles player Devin McIntyre digs out a volley on September 18 against Seaholm.
Small gracefully follows through after a backhand against Seaholm on September 18.
GIRLS VARSITY SWIM TEAM DOMINATES AT SWIM INVITATIONAL

Girls varsity swim team dominates at swim invitational at Holland on Saturday, September 20. Senior swim captain Kelly McGowan shares her thoughts on her team and their victory.

Isabella Gutierrez: Describe how you felt after winning your swim meet last week?
Kelly McGowan: It was really cool to win our very first meet, and we won by quite a lot of point.

IG: Please describe one relay that was really challenging that you won. 
KM: It was an invitational at Holland, the most favored swim team in Division 2, and we were up against five teams including Holland. It was our medley relay. It was the first relay, and we just touched out Holland by less than a tenth. We were so happy!

IG: Who was part of it, and how did teamwork play a role in your win?
KM: It was Frankie Antenucci, Cappy Pierce, Sam Putti, and I. Before every relay race, we do a little pep talk and cheer to pump us up. It really gets us going and brings us closer. Not many teams can say that they have a tight knit team, but we definitely do. You can really see it when we’re yelling and cheering on the sideline, which I think motivates whoever is swimming and makes them go faster.

IG: Who were you up against and what was the score?
 
KM: We got second out of all the six teams: Holland, Marian, Hudsonville, Okemos, and Country Day. Marian beat us, but we beat Holland. That's what we were trying to accomplish going into the race. 

IG: What were their times?
KM: Marian got first at a 1:50.82. Groves got second at a 1:55.82. Holland got third at a 1:55.86

IG: In the mixed relay, who swam what stroke, and what were their times?
KM: Frankie's time was 29.90, and she swam back. Cappy had 32.24 for breast stroke. I did fly in 28.13, and Sam took 25.55 in the free.

IG: How were your captain capabilities shown throughout the game?
KM: Something that made me proud as a captain was that some of our underclassmen swimmers, freshmen Camille Roche and freshmen Miranda French, helped score some points for us. This helped to bring our team a win which was a proud moment for me as a team captain.

IG: How did you personally feel when you found out your team won?
KM: I was ecstatic. My team was around me. We were all huddled, and all I kept saying was “We did it guys, we did it!”. It was a great start to the New Year and our new season.

Interview by Isabella Gutierrez
Photo courtesy of Groves Swimming - Kelly McGowan





ED SHEERAN CONCERT REVIEW

There was absolute mayhem at the Palace of Auburn Hills on Wednesday, September 17. The screaming and shouting was deafening as Ed Sheeran walked on stage and started up right away with “I’m a Mess.” He didn’t stop for two hours, playing fan favorites such as “Don’t,” “I See Fire,” and “Lego House.” Sheeran remained versatile, switching from acoustic to electric guitars and even throwing in a few freestyle raps along the way. The crowd remained interested and responsive throughout, and the disappointment was palpable when he said that “I See Fire” would be his last song. However, everyone went ballistic when he jumped back on stage for his three-song encore, “You Need Me, I Don’t Need You,” “The A Team,” and his grand finale “Sing.” Despite his recent popularity, each song remained fresh and seemed brand-new, and nothing was boring or trite. 

Article by Ethan Webster
 




THE BLACK KEYS TURN DETROIT BLUE

The steel guitar echoed against the silent crowd that packed into the Joe Lewis Arena on Friday, September 12. No one said a word as guitarist and vocalist of The Black Keys Dan Auerbach effortlessly plucked the strings forming a hypnotic melody that left the crowd spellbound. The crowd waited, mesmerized, for him to start the familiar chords "Little Black Submarines." It was the quietest the crowd had been all night. The setlist had been an upbeat and interactive jam session between the crowd, Auerbach, and drummer Patrick Carney until that moment that the piercing white spit light came down. The Ohio based rock band returned to Detroit with a big following; the crowd consisted of returning fans and new alt-rockers, all of whom were dancing and singing along while Auerbach and Carney wailed and pounded out the most incredible songs including "Gotta Get Away" from their new album
Turn Blue as featured in the video below. 
Video and article by Ava Scott






















GROVES STAFF COMPLETES ALS ICE BUCKET CHALLENGE
On August 29 principal Cathy Hurley, assistant principal Darin Wilcox, assistant principal Othamian Peterson, athletic director Tom Flynn, marching band director Jeff Krum, and Seaholm athletic director Aaron Frank accepted the ice bucket challenge at half-time of the first home football game. After getting the buckets of ice water dumped on them, with the help of the cheerleaders, the empty buckets were sent through the bleachers. Fans in the stands were encouraged to donate to the MDA (Muscular Dystrophy Association) to help find a cure and fund treatment for ALS.

Video and article by
Bri Boucher


















GAY RIGHTS

“I do not support gay rights.”

“Gay marriage is a sin.” 

“Gay marriage is good for one thing, and one thing only: population control.”

I read  these quotes from students in a 2003 Scriptor article, an article exposing student reactions to proposed legislation that year to legalize gay marriage in Michigan. That students felt comfortable not just thinking such bigotry but, declaring it in such a public way, with their names and photos next to their statements, flabbergasted me.  I realized that the acceptance most students feel now for all sexual orientations was not always the case, and I wanted to find out how student views on gay rights have changed so drastically in the last thirteen years.

 Principal Cathy Hurley explained some of what helped transform our  environment to be more supportive of gay and lesbian students.

“When it comes to gay marriage, I think Groves has always been a pioneer in creating a safe and strong environment for those who identify as gay. However, we only recently created our Gay Straight Alliance, and over the years it has become increasingly prevalent and powerful,” Hurley said. 

 GSA hosts many events throughout the year, such as the day of silence and ribbon handout, allowing straight students to get in touch with members of the alliance and learn about the lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) students, a community that they may not have already known or understood.  

A survey of 100 students supports Hurley’s statement of the group’s growing power: 85% of the respondents knew about GSC and even knew how to get involved in the group, to stop by room D-8 on Thursdays from 3-4, with no requirement to join other than to contribute making the school a safer place for all students.  In the same survey, I also asked  if they knew of a fellow student who openly identified as gay. Of the 100 students, 92 said “yes”.

Former physics teacher, and now substitute teacher and varsity baseball coach Jim Crosby believes students felt afraid of “coming out” before the GSA.

“Back in 2003, when I was a physics teacher at Groves and an involved staff member, I knew of maybe two openly gay students,” Crosby said.  "Now in 2014 as a substitute teacher, who doesn’t get as involved with the student body, I know of more than five openly gay students, and have had one or two openly gay kids come through the baseball team.” 

  While senior Anna Doyle does not support gay marriage, she also feels students have a right to be open and comfortable with their sexual orientation.  She hopes those students so flippant about the issue in 2003 have matured. 

“While I do not support gay marriage, who people date is their own business and I am not in control of what other people do, “Doyle said. “I am entitled to my opinions, and everyone else is entitled to theirs. No one is right; no one is wrong. It isn’t my job to determine who people are attracted to. That is their right, and that part of it I support.” 

Last year’s senior and president of GSA Jordan Yunker  was not surprised that even students who do not support gay marriage, do support making Groves a safe zone for those to feel accepted and more self-assured, no matter their sexual orientation or gender identity.  

“I think the GSA helps people become comfortable with themselves simply from its presence in the school. By having a group that is active and present in our community, we are showing students that there is a group for them, representing them, helping them to know it's okay to be openly who they are,” Yunker said. “I think GSA also helps students to be comfortable because we do so much against bullying, and I'm sure it's relieving to know that there are people speaking up and out against things like that. Many schools remain silent about the issues that face their LGBT students, and our GSA helps give a voice to those remaining silent about things that must be talked about. I also think when you put events and ideas out there to people who may not know much about LGBT rights/issues or who may not understand, it's good for everyone. I think it helps students who fall outside traditional gender and orientation norms feel better when their straight classmates, who may not understand, are given the chance to understand.”

Last year’s senior and gay straight alliance member Jesse Yaker agrees that Groves is trending in the right direction. 

“Now more than ever I feel like students have a chance to make a difference. We are right there, right on the border of maximum acceptance and that is an amazing thing to see. With Mr. Reese as president of the gay straight alliance, and the student body continuing to grow and learn, the possibilities are endless. I am excited to come back in 2024 and encourage someone to pull out this article and write a follow up on it.” 

Article by Mitchell August
Illustration by Ava Scott






TILL WE'RE FREE

The barn was damp and crowded. Mosquitoes buzzed around the actors and crew members as they attempted to film. Producer Rita Liegl, mother of sophomore Ben Liegl, tried to make conditions bearable for all involved. During filming for nearly twenty hours straight in a musty barn, the cast and crew were ready to go home. Although August 31 was a long day, and only one of many, Liegl, as well as those who worked beside her for several months on Till We’re Free, wanted to educate viewers about Emmett Till’s murder and the role his death played in the civil rights movement.

“After reading the script, I realized the consequences of Till’s death was such an important message to get out there, because, despite studying the civil rights in school, not many people know about it,” Liegl said.“The movie teaches the importance of tolerance and understanding, values that some still bypass today.”

The film was shown at the Royal Oak Main Art Theater on March 5th, where over four hundred people attended. The premiere ended with a question and answer session with the cast and crew who attended the opening. 

Several Groves students participated in this 20-minute film, including sophomore Ben Liegl, sophomore Omar Mitchell, and senior Tai Terry. The students lent a hand in set building, lighting, and acting. One of the most difficult days of filming happened in Monroe for the convenient store scene. The store scene was an important part of filming, capturing the day when Emmett flirted with a white woman, which led to his unjustifiable murder. For the cast and crew the day was a challenge, requiring them to build a convenience store and tear it down the same day.

“The day of the store scene, we got to the location, and it was literally an abandoned building,” Terry said. “It was literally just nuts, bolts, and wood sticks and we had to make an entire structure out of that.”

Ben Leigl described another part of building the set that tormented the crew.

“It was difficult fending off wasps while building a fake general store,” Ben said. “It definitely was not fun trying to fight them off while trying to build a crazy set.”

Other locations did not require altering, but still didn’t provide ideal filming conditions. An abandoned barn in Monroe was used as a set for the scene in which Emmett was brutally beaten, making it an essential part of the movie. The barn was exactly what the filmmakers envisioned for their set, but this was not a favorite among the cast and crew.

“It was like this tiny little barn, so it was over a hundred years old,” Ben said. “It was pretty crazy because there were old chemicals all around and the entire barn was this horrible musty thing.”

Filming in decrepit sets was only the start of many challenges the cast and crew faced but they overcome these obstacles by working together. After building the sets and structures, the cast performed in the harrowing scenes and in roles that went against their values. The nature of the film required the actors to take themselves back to the 1955 and embrace the racism within the script.

The process of becoming the character was different for each actor, some channeling their inner child to play roles while others found themselves trying to accept and qualify views they do not normally believe in. Terry, playing the role of Simeon Wright, Emmitt’s cousin, found the adjustments to playing his character hard at times due to the difference in the treatment of his character in that time period.

“African Americans had to feel like less than themselves, and that was really hard to get into character.  You actually felt for those people, and so it made you want to work harder to give the people a real tribute,” Terry said. “They deserve to be recognized for the hardship they went through and deserve to be recognized for being discriminated against just because of their skin color and nothing else, not the conscience of their character or anything else. I’m always open to all people and just felt so distraught, so demoralized by the racism of it all.”

Some actors were so uncomfortable with their characters that they apologized at the end of the day. Actor Sean Beligian, who played the role of J.W. Bryant, one of the men who beat Emmett, was particularly unnerved by his character.

“Sean would apologize every day after the filming although it wasn’t him,” Terry said. “He was just playing a character, but he still apologized because he’s that kind of guy.”

With the actors feeling the weight of the injustice from the senseless murder of Till, and of playing roles that put them in the shoes of such racist people, the crew tried to help raise their moral. 

“There was a lot of laughter off set, and I specifically worked on keeping it light, because the subject matter when they were filming was so difficult to do,” Liegl said.

When shooting the store scene, actors began their day by helping the crew build the set. Once the cast finished, they had to from actor to character on the side of the road just before filming.

“I was completely naked in the middle of some street, in the middle of Monroe where no one knew; off the map,” Terry said. “And that was fun because I had to change, and I got the chance to take my glasses off and be someone different.”

Although Liegl and her team felt it was important to produce Till’s story, the film remained underfunded. The cast and crew were paid in nothing but sandwiches and cookies for their time building and filming. The low-budget of the film required the students to cover as many different roles as they could to help production. Many cast members turned into crew when needed and crew filled in as extras, putting down their hammers and putting on costumes to help fill scenes.

“For the store we didn’t have all the tools, so we had to hand do the construction,” Mitchell said. “Ben had to lift me up so someone could hammer on top, and it was a really straining.”

Some cast members, such as Terry, were required to play more roles in the film than they expected.

“I played Emmitt’s dead body, because I was the only one there,” Terry said, “so all the dead body scenes were me because I was available.”

Despite the exhaustion of playing so many roles, Terry thought the experience was rewarding.

  “I’m not going to say it wasn’t stressful, because it was,” Terry said. “I worked literally from six to one in the morning until after nine p.m. That’s literally more than all day, from dark to dark, just working, working, working. That was hard, but it paid off.  It really did.”

Filming and editing took eight months and the film debuted two months after, but the work didn’t stop there.  The team is now pushing to get Till Were Free in other theaters.

“You’re not just making a film that nobody’s going to see and learn from,” Liegl said.

The film will be entered into the Mitten film festival and open for another private viewing at the Royal Oak Main Art Theater in September.

Article by Bri Boucher
Photos from Rita Liegel 

Above:

Set building in Monroe was an obstacle that the cast and crew faced together. Sophomore Omar Mitchell, a crew member on set, and senior Tai Terry, a cast member in the film, along with several others lent a hand to put up the store scene. “Usually when you do the construction of the set you have a lot of equipment, but we didn’t have a lot of that stuff,” Mitchell said “but most of the time I thought about how being a part of the movie was pretty cool, so that thought alone kept me going."

Below: Producer Rita Liegl does the makeup of Chevonne Wilson who plays the mother of Emmett Till in the film. Working with professionals with a small budget proved not to be as big of an issue as Liegl expected. “I have professional actors in there and you’re basically saying you work for lunch and some cookies,” Liegl said. Regardless of no pay, actors continued to give their time and effort to the making of the film.






BROKEN BATHROOMS

"Senioritis" has struck again! And in the most unlikely place. At the beginning of the year, we only had one working sink in the girls' bathroom, but now, two trimesters later, it's given out as well. Seems as though the bathrooms are as done with school as the students.

Article by Fayth Kakos and Ava Scott





COACH FLAHERTY NAMED 2014 DIVERSITY CHAMPION

Most known coach in the school- Brendan Flaherty, who will soon be honored by the Birmingham Bloomfield Race Relations and Diversity Task Force as a 2014 Diversity Champion! He has done incredible work for his teams and for athletes of all types. For over 21 years he has been a coach and a teacher and most definitely this award couldn’t go to anyone else but him.

The last 14 of those, Flaherty has become a beloved fixture at Groves High School. These kids idolize him and appreciate the hard work that he puts into his job. He continues to guide students in his classrooms and sports teams to build relationships across race, class, and ability. He is a great coach and also a caring, a one-of-a-kind teacher. He is a good role model for high school students and not for what the average person might think.

With the special needs community needing some love, Flaherty launched Birmingham’s first "Victory Day," where students with disabilities, are mentored by players in the Groves football program. These kids experienced the excitement of playing football under the stadium lights to the cheers of parents, teachers, and friends. It was a kind hearted gesture that turned out to be very successful. He is modest about his achievements the majority of the time. 

“It's not just Victory Day...it's EVERYTHING you do in this place with so many students for so many students,” said Leandrea Graham Boyer, “We are lucky to have you Mr. And NO MORE deferring this compliment!!!!” 

Flaherty is already up and working on a school project involving Mothers Day.
“I want to do an event or project for my players and their Mom's next month,” said Flaherty, “maybe a guest speaker that could come in and enhance the relationships of Mom's and sons.”
He mentioned that he shares his award with Kelly Jean (personal trainer). 

-Article by Rosemary Bostek



PUSHING THE LIMITS

Pushing the Limits by Katie McGarry is a heart-wrenching young adult book about two teens that have been through hell and back struggling to put the shattered pieces of their lives back together and finding love along the way. Seventeen year-old Echo Emerson used to be part of the popular crowd. Two years ago things changed. Her parents divorced, her babysitter became her step-mother, and her older brother Aires died in combat. But this is not the event that changed everything for Echo. Two years ago, an event she can't remember resulted in her waking up in the hospital two-days later, with injuries up and down both her arms. Injuries that left her with ugly scars and a restraining order against her mother. Because of the incident Echo has been mandated by the State to attend therapy sessions. She has just been assigned a new therapist, one that she shares with Noah Hutchins, resident bad-boy with a reputation of one-night-stands. Noah Hutchins has his own problems. Two and half years ago, he was on the honor-roll, competed in sports, and had the perfect family. Two loving parents and two-younger brothers. This was before his parents were killed in a house fire. Now Noah is separated from his little brothers. They have been separated, Noah lives with one family and his two younger brothers live in another home. Noah's dream is to get his brothers back and reunite what's left of his family. He's had a string of bad luck with the homes he's been placed in. This is why he is now in court mandated therapy sessions, and on limited visitation with his younger brothers. I congratulate Katie McGarry for making me care so much for these characters. As an avid reader it’s important for me to connect with the characters, and their stories. McGarry really made that happen for me. If you are a hopeless romantic like me this is the perfect story for you to read. It’s easy to get lost in the story of Echo and Noah; I would give this book four stars out of five. 

-Article by
Ky Wright



FROM PAGE TO SCREEN! MEET & GREET WITH LOCAL ACTRESS MILICA (MILA) GOVICH FROM "THE FAULT IN OUR STARS."
On Thursday, June 19 from 7:00-8:00pm, grades 7-12 are invited to a meet and greet with Detroit-based actress Milica (Mila) Govich. She shines in a featured rol in The Fault in Our Stars opposite Golden Globe-nominated Shailene Woodley and Oscar-nominated Laura Dern. This film is based on John Green's best-selling novel which explores the funny and tragic business of two teenagers who meet and fall in love at a cancer support group. Govich plays that mother of lead character Augustus Waters. 
Learn what it's like to film a movie and get all of your questions answered!












CLIMATE CHANGE: DID THIS WINTER SHAKE YOUR THOUGHTS?
Post your comments to our twitter. 

-Carly Yashinsky




















GROVES AND SEAHOLM TAKES A BIG STEP INTO THE NEW TECHNOLOGICAL AGE

Over the winter Groves and Seaholm Engineering Department received a very special present:  a brand new MakerBot Replicator 2X, also known as a 3D Printer.  Birmingham Schools acquired the printers through a grant from the Birmingham Education Foundation.  

“The reason being is to promote product development and sustainability within Groves and Seaholm,” said engineering teacher Mrs. Rosa Everitt.  Students will be able to design projects in AutoCAD software and print a prototype relatively cheaply. 

“It’s a big push right now in industry, there’s a lot of prototyping going on, and it does save companies money, but for us on the educational aspect it’s really to show, are we drawing right? Are we learning how to communicate with each other to make sure pieces fit together?”

Almost all students can use the printer as long as they have something to print. There are students in the 3D Modeling class, Architecture class, and many independent students who are working by themselves outside of class. This is a big step for the Birmingham Engineering Department towards industry level design, work, and creation.

Article and photos by William Briggs






X-BLOCK CHANGES REDUCES TO ONE DAY-WHAT WILL THIS MEAN FOR STUDENTS NEXT YEAR?

Stress. That’s what Taylor Bundar felt as her world literature class discussed four chapters of The Kite Runner that she had not read.  Bundar missed one day of the class this spring and worried that the integrated languages and various narrators in the novel would make it impossible to catch up. 

   “I was having trouble finding supportive evidence for a paper that was assigned while I was absent. I was so nervous,” Bundar said.  

Looking for guidance, Bundar spoke with Snyder during x-block, along with a full classroom of students seeking help. 

“It felt so much better after I went to see Ms. Snyder during xblock, and she walked me through what I didn’t understand,” Bundar said. “The chapters she helped me with became clearer.”

Next year, however, Bundar won’t have this opportunity as frequently because of a new state law that pushed Groves to remove one day of x-block from its Tuesday and Thursday schedule.

The state of Michigan used to count the thirty five hours of professional development (x-block) toward instructional time; however, the state recently decided that any professional development could no longer count toward the hours schools are required to be in school. This change means that students need to be in class for thirty-five hours longer.  Thirty-five hours is equivalent to one week of school or one less day of x-block.  The administration and teacher union decided to remove one day of x-block and lengthen the time of the one remaining x-block day to sixty minutes  on Wednesdays.

Principle Cathy Hurley played a role in the choice to reduce x-block.  She struggled to find a solution best for the students and shared that the decision was not easy.

“I don’t think anyone really wanted to go one more week in June, nor did they want to extend the school day much later,” Hurley said. “But right now when you see empty classes during x-block, it is not as imperative as it used to be."

Junior Ella Dacey is part of the other half of students who would prefer only one x-block to accommodate the state’s new mandate rather than go to school longer but still expressed concerns about losing that time.
 “It is nice having shorter classes and time to sleep in, but I could live without two days of x block,” Dacey said.
Senior Zoe Rice  also uses x-block regularly to sleep in and make up tests and quizzes but still agrees with Dacey.
“I use x-block to mostly get the rest I don’t get the other days, and it will be hard for students next year to not have that luxury.   I look forward to Tuesdays and Thursdays because I’m more rested, and the shorter classes are almost a break from the stress of the week,” Rice said.  “I think the students next year will be really stressed out.  This is basically part of Groves culture.  Still,  I would rather have one less day of x-block over an extra week of school.” 

To address these student concerns, Hurley confirmed that students with absences and test make-ups will have the time they need to see their teachers and emphasized that the testing center will still be available to students before and after school.  Hurley did admit that students such as Laub may need to give up lunch time and come in before or stay after the normal school day next year.  

Laub will need to find an alternate time to finish work. Math and English teacher, Dan Inloes agrees with Laub that students benefit from using x-block as unstructured time.  

  “Not having one day of X-block means that students will have to scramble a bit more to find to make up tests and get help from teachers, especially those students who have commitments after school,” Inloes said.  “I think students benefit from the unstructured time, which they can use to get extra help, complete work missed due to absences, or just sleep in.”
Government teacher Robert Divizio believes the removal will make it harder to help his students efficiently, but he thinks it’s finally time to say goodbye to the old and hello to the new.  Divizio feels that we’ve been holding on to x-block for too long and it’s time to let it go.

“I think if we remove one day we might as well just remove it altogether,” Divizio said. “It will be more difficult for students to see their teachers only on one day and it begins to lose its original purpose, which is to meet with students.”
Science teacher Bonnie Bartnick sees students both during x-block and during both lunches.  Bartnick agrees with Divizio that there isn’t enough time to see all their students.

“I don't think there's enough time outside of class to meet with students on our current schedule, so I do have concerns about this time being reduced,” Bartnick said. “I understand why we are doing this, but I feel it places a burden on the student who is out because of illness or the student who needs extra help.”

Bartnick’s concern was one that was heard by the administration.

“The teachers really want to see time given to students we want to maximize that time best for students,” Hurley said. “I think there are too many students that don’t use it right now so, I’m okay with it.  I see every class everyday and most classes are empty, so it’s not as imperative as it once was.”

Article and photos by Jordyn Plotnik

Geometry teacher Zachary Spenser helps a class full of geometry students on a February 6th during x-block.  Spenser has a packed room on a regular x-block day.  Students Coco Lurz and Sydney Laub went that morning to improve their ability to to graph circles because they were confused about the concept in class.  

“Spenser gets around to all the students during xblock even though he has so many.” Lurz said.




BRICK MANSION MOVIE REVIEW
Intense, strong, extreme, and overpowering. Those are adjectives you would expect for the late Paul Walker’s latest film, Brick Mansions right? He’s been in one of the most talked about action series of all time - Fast and Furious, a series that’s grossed over 2 billion dollars. I was anticipating a highly entertaining and interesting movie, but to my dismay, I was introduced to a meek, and extremely cliche’d “thriller.” It had all of the characteristics of the average action movie; the smart and attractive hero, the evil wrongdoer, and the beautiful female villain. The movie takes place in Detroit (a creepy scary Detroit, with way more crime than there truly is), abandoned brick mansions, are where the worst criminals live. Since there is so much crime, the police build a gate around the mansions to protect the civilians from them. Damien Collier, a cop played by Paul Walker, plots revenge for the death of his father, which was caused by drug dealer Tremaine Alexander, played by Rza, with the help of Lino who helps because Tremaine has Lino’s ex-girlfriend. The movie is totally boring and predictable, and if you really want to see a high action Paul Walker film, I suggest you wait until next year’s Fast and Furious 7, or just watch the old Fast and Furious films, because I assure you, you will be disappointed if you see the new one Article by Andi Smith







INTERACTS NEWEST SERVICE

Students gather in the conference room for this month’s Interact meeting. We decided to help certain teachers with tasks around the school. Some students helped the librarians organize things in the library and some helped Ms. Bartnik to make posters to hang up around school with the Green Club for Earth Day. If you are looking for a club to join, this is the one. We not only do services around the school, but we also do services for the community. We have a trip coming up this Saturday to plant trees in Detroit, and we also have annual trips to Arden Court as well to go visit senior citizens and do fun activities with them. Last meeting we wrote letters to soldiers with nice messages. I love what we get to do in the club because it always feels great to do something for our school and our community. 

-Article by Bella Gutierrez 
-Photo by Christine Geoghegan 





 

ARE YOUR SHORTS TOO SHORT?
As the sun gets higher and stronger, the clothes at Groves’s high school become shorter and more inappropriate. This is something the high school has struggled with for years: dress code. How to enforce dress code, and what should be the way of determining whether something is appropriate or not is always a struggle, but, within the last few years Groves has been the model of consistency when it comes to our dress code. 

Drop you arms straight down. 

Extend Your Fingers. 

Are your shorts shorter than this? 

If they are you are in violation of the groves policy when it comes to dress code. In order to be in compliance you must be wearing shorts that extend past your finger tips when fully extended. When it comes to tops, the straps on ones outfit must be thicker than 3 fingers. These rules are both reasonable and sensible. They allow the student to self check while at home and are basic enough were misunderstanding can be few and far between. However, all the rules are simple enforcing them is not always as easy. When asked about how the dress code and how it will be enforced principal Cathy Hurley talked a lot about the honor code. “Students will be required to show respect for teachers, administration and their fellow peers, we won’t be out there looking to catch anyone, if we notice it, we will address it, but we rely on the responsible students of Groves’s high school to make the right choices and enforce the rules among themselves.” Everyone should go through and check to see if their wardrobe complies, play it safe and check now. Respect your peers, teachers, and administration and wear what we deem appropriate. 

-Mitchell August






 

GROVES TRACK SUSTAINS WIND DAMAGE, HAMPERS ABILITY FOR TRACK TEAM TO HOST MEETS AND PRACTICES

On April 4
th, the Groves track experienced an abnormal disturbance when a sizeable portion was torn from its location near the 100-meter mark. Eyewitness accounts have surfaced from the boys of the Seaholm baseball team, who were at Groves to perform the ropes course, located next to the visitor football bleachers. Many say that a sudden gust of wind blew through, picking the asphalted track right off its foundation and leaving it laying freely on the surrounding area.

Seaholm sophomore and baseball player Tucker Pfaff described the bizarre occurrence that incurred the damage to the track.

“It was this big vortex of wind; it was almost like a mini tornado or something. It just swept through and tore the track right off. We all couldn’t believe our eyes,” Pfaff said.

When the track was due for a touch up a couple years ago, it was simply retouched by filling in the cracks and other faults. The more sensible alternative, resurfacing the track entirely, would’ve been more expensive, although it also would’ve yielded a significantly more solid structure. In addition to faulty restoration, other causes for the damage may have included the severity of this past winter, as well as excessive, intense usage. The ruined segment of the track is the site that the track team’s sprinters have practiced for many years now; a combination of their sharp spikes clenching the track for hours each week could have loosened the asphalt from its place, and, combined with the multitude of other runners who utilize the track, might have inadvertently separated it from its concrete foundation. 

Furthermore, this past winter’s brutality, combined with the recent tremendously high wind speeds, definitely could’ve attributed to the track being loosened and destabilized, leaving it susceptible to damage.

However, social studies teacher Jim Sherman believes an odd facet of the track may be at fault for the damage—its color. 

“If you look at other schools in the area, their tracks aren’t black. Many of their tracks are red, because it doesn’t hold in as much heat as black, and, after black tracks, the cheapest tracks are red ones,” Sherman said.

Repairs to the Groves track have been completed in time for the track team to hold meets at home. The portion, although fairly diminutive in comparison to the entire track, was a vital part of several track events. The exposed cement fissures from the destruction rendered the track’s three outside lanes unusable. Athletic director Tom Flynn explained what effects the damage could have had on the track and field season, and the importance of fixing the issue.

“We wouldn’t have been able to run on it,” Flynn said. “It had affected the track to the point where we could not physically run on it.”

The timing is a bit inopportune, as the remainder of the team’s meets are away, but the track will be ready to go for next season.

-Article and photo by 
Sam Frederik and Emma Dolan





VARSITY GIRLS SOFTBALL

On April 17th 2014 the Groves varsity softball team had their first game against Southfield Christian. During the first few innings it seemed like Southfield Christian was going to win but our team made a comeback. Savannah Tatum, captain and pitcher, pitched an amazing game and got 3 girls out from the opposing team.  At the end the Groves varsity softball team won! They won 17 to 3; I think that’s what you a call a blow out. Hopefully our team will continue to win and bring home districts again.


Girls Varsity Softball. Savannah Tatum. 11th grade. Girl’s varsity softball captain, Savannah Tatum in the 1st inning pitching against Southfield Christian on April 17th, 2014. 

-Photos and caption by Ky Wright






VARSITY BOYS BASEBALL

Senior and varsity baseball right outfielder Beau Harms readies his stance in preparation for a pitch from Harrison during their game on April 16th. It was a difficult match for the team, losing to Harrison 0-8. There were a few good hits from Groves’s players throughout the game, but Harms said it was not their best game by far. “Baseball is a game of momentum; we gave up a lot of momentum in the beginning of the game, and when you lose it so early on, it’s hard to gain it back,” Harms said.



Senior Beau Harms swings with passion against Harrison's pitcher during the boys varsity baseball game April 16th, 2014, where Groves lost 0-8 against Harrison.

-Photos and caption by Carly Yashinsky






RUN THE GAME
Run the Game by Jason Myers is a book about a 19-year-old young man named Alexander who meets a girl named Patti that is 14 years old in the A-lot. The A-lot is where the prostitutes go to get picked up. When Alexander sees her for the first time its love at first site. But this love for Patti comes with a price because she is a hooker and has a pretty messed up family who has abused her for most her life, however she is the toughest person Alexander will ever meet and know. Alexander has to pay Burke in order to keep Patti as his girlfriend. What I liked about the book is that there is great description and there is a great plot. The way Myers describes events and makes them relate to a young mans life. He also made this book a love it or hate it. If you're a person that is not really into graphic stuff and profane language you probably wont like this book. However this book will fall into the young adult category because this is what a lot of young men do and it relates to a lot of stuff that young men want to do. There wasn’t anything that I really disliked about this book besides the intense sex scenes every other page but besides that Run the game is a 9 out of 10. Overall this is a great book and I would highly recommend Run the Game. The perplexing twist in the plot and weird relativity makes it a page-turner. I couldn’t put the book down until I was done. Anyone that likes a kind of young adult book that doesn't mind a lot of cursing, intense drug scenes, and explicit sex scenes would love this book. I would recommend this book to people that get into the mature stuff that this book talks about or people who know about this kind of life style. I am glad I read this book because it opened my eyes to a reality that I have never seen before. 

 -Ky Wright







FORENSIC SENIORS GOING STRONG
Some seniors have already been met with the end of their seasons, but the forensic seniors are still going strong. At least ten seniors will be advancing to states with high individual scores. When asked about how it feels to be advancing, they have all described it as "exciting", and Grant Jackson has said that the "hard work paid off". The Groves Forensic team will be going to the state tournament on the first weekend of May. 








Lily Douma, a part of the forensic team for three years, took third place in the prose category and is "mostly excited, a little bit nervous" to be going to states.











Grant Jackson, along with his partner Nick Alexander, took first place in duo.











Bradley Smith took second place in the oratory category and has said that "the team has really come together at times like this."



-Bri Boucher

All photos done by Bri Boucher.

RADIUM GIRLS COMES TO THE LITTLE THEATER
On Thursday night the curtains will open to reveal the wood and metal workshop that commands the stage, leaving spectators curious as to what the cold set will bring to life--or death. The show follows Grace Fryer, a radium girl who works painting glow-in-the-dark watches in the 1920s. The talent of GPAC with a dedicated technical crew create a memorable show surrounding a mysterious illness, cancer, radium, lawyers, and watches. Come down to the little theater to see the show!

-Ava Scott
Picture at top: Seniors Weston Blum, Nick Alexander, and Cory Shanbom meet to discuss business in the first act. 

Center picture: Junior Ethan Carrick hosts a press conference with sophomore Dylan Comsa over the effects of radium. 

Picture at bottom: Seniors Grant Jackson, Rebecca Starr, Emily Finn and junior Alina Steinberg discuss the grave situation at hand.

Picture at left: Junior Amira Kamoo reports to the audience. 

All photos done by
Ava Scott.







MILEY ARRIVES IN DETROIT VIA HOTDOG
The lights danced through the sky. The piercing reflection was almost hypnotic. It glittered in the eyes of her adoring fans. People can say many things about Miley Cyrus and her various scandalous outfits and performances, but you can’t deny that she knows how to put on a show! Throughout the entire concert she kept the crowd entertained with various stunts--at one point she was being carried into the air on top of a hotdog, but also let her raw talent shine through with beautifully recreated covers. She serenaded us with Jolene and entranced us with Summertime Sadness. Cyrus played a lot of the songs on her album as well, and the crowd sang along with their phones in the air, flashlights on, bobbing to the beat! It was almost like stars were lighting up the sky. It was an upbeat and fun concert that fans aren’t likely to forget anytime soon! 
-Fayth Kakos

Photos by Fayth Kakos









GROVES ARTISTS' WORK SELECTED TO HANG AT COBO CENTER
Over Spring Break, second trimester Graphic Design students, Clare Colburn and Garret Mason, will be recognized for their poster designs, and their designs will be on display April 8th-10th during the SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) 2014 World Congress at Cobo Center in Detroit. Colburn and Mason placed 5th and 6th out of hundreds of entrees and will be rewarded with a $50 check for their work. The designs were made with a combination of Fotoshop and Adobe Illustrator, along with hand drawn elements that were scanned and put into the poster.












First piece by Garret Mason
























Second piece by Clare Colburn















-William Briggs







GROVES SKI TEAM HITS THE SLOPES




Senior ski team captain Lily Doolin completes a Giant Slalom (GS) run during the regional race at Pine Knob on February 12.  Doolin completed her senior season with a fifth place regional slalom finish and a tenth place regional slalom finish, earning her a state qualification (and later, an All-State Honorable Mention) and helping to lead the BU Girls’ ski team to a seventh place finish. 







Senior captain Andy Sagante runs slalom during the divisional race at Mount Brighton on February 6. Sagante finished fourth in slalom and fifth in GS at the race—with his help, the BU boys team scored a second place divisional finish.








This year, the BU ski team saw the most successful season it’s had in years—both the girls’ and boys’ teams had top-ten team finishes at regionals (seventh and ninth, respectively) and top-five finishes at divisionals (fourth and second).  Below-freezing conditions and record snowfall didn’t stop the racers from driving to Mt. Brighton four nights a week in order to race and practice.



-Photos and article by Emma Dolan








GROVES STUDENTS TALK SPRING BREAK

David Schwartz: This spring break I am going to the Bahamas. I am going because most of my group of friends is going along with people from other schools.  This experience will be an awesome chance to take a break with the people I love and kick back and relax. Bahamas is also an awesome opportunity because it is relatively cheap and easy to organize. When my parents were my age they went to the Bahamas for spring break and I can’t wait to have the same amazing experience they had. 

Brian Jelineck: I am going to Florida because the weather is consistent and the people are very friendly. Also a lot of kids from other schools will be going to Siesta Key where I am going. It will be easy to have fun and it is also nice to stay in the country and not have to take international flights. Price was also a factor when choosing Florida for spring break. Going to the Bahamas, Dominican Republic, or Mexico has more potential to be fun, but the cost is just too much. Staying in Florida, I am able to stay at my friend’s uncle’s house for nearly free. Food and sleeping accommodations will be provided by him, so this weighed into my decision. 

Sahan Kanthadi: This spring break I am staying home and I think it will be pretty fun. There are a ton of people staying home from spring break for all different reasons. One of the main reasons is the cost, but along with that are sports, previous commitments or just thinking it will be more fun here. I hope to hang out with friends most days and see my family and people I haven’t seen in a while. I will also take this time to apply to a couple of honors colleges and fill out housing forms for schools. 

Paige Hamburger: This spring break I will be going to Mexico with my closest guy and girl friends. It is going to be an unbelievable time. I feel like the trips really split up into a couple groups and it was just about picking one. While Mexico is kind of dangerous I do not believe it will be an issue within the resort community. Just to be sure my parents will be down at a different resort in case of emergency. I cannot wait to sit down in the sun and have fun with my friends. We probably will not be able to leave the resort as much as some of the other vacations, but I do not see it being a problem. 

Amy Stevens: For spring break I am going to my house in St. John’s. There was not really a choice about where to go, since my family does have this beautiful house down in St. John. The weather is always perfect there and the trip will be free for me and only cost a little for my parents. I am fortunate enough to be able to go with my boyfriend Ib [Saad], and that will make the trip even more fun. My family of course will be coming with us, and it is my favorite thing in the world to do, spend time with my family, relax on the beach, and hang out with Ib. St. Johns is a small, but beautiful island and is very calm. Right now there are only a couple of resorts on the whole entire island, so I doubt there will be too many people going there as a spring break destination. Most people from our school I feel like split up into their friend groups and are going to either Mexico or the Bahamas. No matter how many people go where spring break will always be a blast.  



-Photos and article by Mitchell August

On a day like today, isn't it nice to imagine yourself outside at sunny Beverly Park, wearing running shorts and a snazzy Forte 5K t-shirt?
The 2nd annual Groves Forte 5K is just 2 months away....
Have you signed up to run or walk our USATF certified course??
Please forward the attached flyer to everyone you know.  Register early to ensure your t-shirt size! 
Last year, we had 100 runners, this year, we are hoping to, at least,  double that number!!!!! Anyone can join!
Look for our previous email about our sponsorship contest!!! We need your help securing sponsors, too!

SENIOR KAITLIN FLAHERTY SIGNED WITH WAGNER COLLEGE
-Fayth Kakos
SENIOR JACKIE FEIST SIGNED WITH IOWA STATE
-William Briggs
LORDE CONCERT MARCH 9, 2014

When the opening band, Lo-Fang, finished their set, the diverse crowd lulled in the tiered open floor of the Filmore Theatre. Roadies prepped the stage for her appearance. Then the lights when down and a bright white beam fell down the middle of the stage. Heads whipped to the stage, and hearts pounded as the best dropped and a black clad, frail figure shrouded with a curly mane appeared on stage. Her slightly raspy voice echoed across the room as she sang the words “There’s a humming in the restless summer air,” and opened with Glory and Gore. 

The artist Lorde performed at the Filmore on March 9, 2014. The video below is a collaboration of moments from the concert enjoyed by all who came.

-Ava Scott

THE CHILDISH GAMBINO CONCERT MARCH 22, 2014
Image 1:Childish Gambino performs a medley of songs from his repertoire, including trademark songs, "Heartbeat", "Bonfire", and "Freaks and Geeks".
Image 2: Childish Gambino concludes the concert with signature freestyle.
Image 3: Childish Gambino returns to Michigan and bursts onto stage performing "Playing Around Before the Party".
Image 4: Childish Gambino at The Fillmore in Detroit March 22, 2014 performing "Crawl".

-Andi Smith
 

ATTENTION SENIORS!

Senior Seminar welcomes the entire Class of 2014 to the Kensington Church campus in Troy (at Square and John R) on Thursday, march 20th 2014 from 9 AM to 2 PM. There will be interesting workshops to help seniors prepare for life beyond Groves and students who do not attend Senior Seminar must be in school all day. Volunteers are also needed and it’ll count as community service.

How to attend?

  1. REGISTER! Go to the Main Office and pay $15 to Groves via community service organizer Christine Geoghegan or book-keeper Connie Young, or ask for a fee waiver.
  2. PLAN A RIDE! You can take the bus from Groves or plan your own transportation. If you need to get on the bus list, see Mrs. G or indicate on the survey that you need the bus.
  3. FILL OUT THE SURVEY! Check your school email anytime after March 7th to indicate your workshop preferences. Do this by March 13TH 2014!

 

How to volunteer?

  1. Volunteers are needed to set up at Kensington on Wednesday, March 19th at 9 – 10 PM. Parents are also welcome to help with breakfast and lunch.
  2. See Christine Geoghegan in the Main Office near the counselors in the back or contact her at cg10bps@birmingham.k12.mi.us or 248-203-3509

Br Raditya Draningtyas

Below is a video interview with social studies teacher Jim Sherman discussing his hunt for Big Foot and his feature on Animal Planet.

For more Finding Big Foot fun, check out the link below
http://animal.discovery.com/tv-shows/finding-bigfoot/videos/a-sasquatch-nearby.htm









Video interview with world language department head and lead singer of Blackthorn
     World language department head and French teacher Richard McMullan describes how his band, Blackthorn, incorporates Irish culture, audience participation, and brings together various generations.  McMullan also explains the tradition behind Blackthorn's upcoming performance in the Wylie E. Groves little theatre on Saturday, January 18th. Come see Blackthorn perform folksy Irish classics for the benefit of the Senior All Night Party.

By Jason Cribbs and Eli Winer










MLK Assembly – What to Expect

 

This year, the focus is on our very own Groves community as there will be no guest speakers.  Over 40 students are involved in this year’s assembly. The theme is “Be a Small Voice for Big Change; Speak Truth to the Power”. The many participants in this year’s assembly have been asked to respond and explain what Martin Luther King Junior stands for in 2014. In particular it is expected that Sophomore Jasmine Jordan will be reading what she has learned about her ancestor and cousin Rosa Parks. The Groves Evergreen Choir will perform as well as the Groves Electronic Mayhem including Senior Megan Giancarlo on the cello.

By: Nikita Felch






Junior Kyle Stratton and Senior David Snyder light up the holidays again

 

Nothing says holiday spirit more than a house so bright it can be seenfrom an intersection away.Junior Kyle Stratton and senior David Snyder have been trying to spread the holiday spirit since November and finished late last week.Stratton and Snyder created a light show, which moves to music, from an estimated 28,000 to 31,000 individual light bulbs. 

“I started two years ago and this is the second year I’ve done this,” Stratton said.  “I’ve actually gone crazy.”

The glowing house isn’t just covered with lights but is also topped with an inflatable Santa driving an airplane. 

The second annual light display at the Stratton house is worth a visit this holiday season and can be seen at 6812 North Clunbury Road, West Blooomfield Township.


 The Giving Tree where students, staff and parents sign up to donate specific items to the Go-Care Program

Groves has made it a priority to give back to the community since its existence.   Despite what others like to believe, there are people in our community suffering financially and personally.  The Groves Go- Care Program, ran by Community Service Organizer, Christine Geoghegan provides an opportunity for people to give back to those in need in their own community.

“The program aims to provide them with items that may be helpful for them to enjoy the Holiday Season or just to meet their basic needs throughout the year,” Geohegan said.

Families in need are referred to the program and students, staff and parents participate by donating specific items listed on the giving tree or by donating gift cards. Groves Go-Care is the epitome of charity starting at home.

By Imani Roberson

Alumnus Bully Book inspires students
    Freshmen Lilly Flechsig and Mikhail Adler know what it’s like to be bullied.  They were sitting at their table in the cafeteria on October 28, when three other students approached their table with an iPhone, apparently streaming a live video of the students eating.  Those filming them refused to leave when asked.

    The students at the table stood up and asked the filming students to delete the video, then sat back down and resumed eating.  A few minutes later, a group of boys came back to the table, and began touching the eating students and calling them names.

    
Flechsig and Adler asked the boys to leave, but they wouldn’t.  Instead, they continued to run a live video streaming app on the iPhone, giggling and touching the students sitting at the table.

    "
This continued for ten minutes until people started throwing food at us as if we were animals," Adler said.

    
The bullying only stopped when the students at the table involved the administration.

    
Flechsig described the emotional and physical effects the bullying had on her.

    "
I was full of anxiety the rest of the day. I am a girl and having a large group of boys come up and start to touch me and harass me is scary! I felt like if I didn't do something they would hurt one of us," Flechsig said.

    
The experience shared by these students coincided with an announcement of the upcoming release of The Bully Book: A Novel, written by Groves alum Eric Kahn Gale.  Gale was bullied in middle school and translated his own experiences into a fictional story about Eric Haskins, the book’s protagonist, who learns how to deal with the bullies by reading a "curious" book of instructions. Gale will be reading his book on November 11, at 5:30 p.m., at the Jewish Community Center on Maple Road.

    Adler expressed interest in attending the reading.

    "
I can’t say it [The Bully Book: A Novel] will solve the harassment issue. But this book can help others before this type of situation happens to them," Adler said.

    
Flechsig agreed.

    "
By making it [the novel] required reading, it would make sense. The book would put people in the shoes of the person they could potentially bully," Flechsig said, "and I think that’s really important."

    
-Emma Dolan



Operation dodgeball raises spirits and money for charity on November 7th
    
    The teams strut out onto the court in an array of fashion: booty-shorts, Tie-dye tee-shirts, Timberland boots.   Senior James Miller (then a junior) danced out with his team, all wearing jeans cut to their knees, plaid shirts rolled up to reveal their stomachs, and carrying old-school boom boxes, blasting music for the audience.

    This comedic aspect of Operation Dodge Ball is just one reason why senior Brianna Rowe plans to attend again this year on November 7 in the Groves gym, starting at 4 p.m.

    “The competition is great and nearly half the school goes to cheer the teams.  James’ team won last year, and, after they danced out and made the audience laugh, they got real serious,” Rowe said.  “You could just tell his team was more athletic, more prepared.”

    Rowe recommends that everyone buy a ticket to be part of this yearly fundraiser.

    “I know playing and getting hit is not everyone’s thing,” Rowe said, “but watching it is.  It’s so funny watching people try to duck a ball and get hit anyway or they fall down and jump up to try to leap over another ball. It’s just constant action.”

    This year, Operation Dodge Ball will raise money for Opportunity Detroit, a charity dedicated to helping revitalize business and Detroit’s artistic community to help both residents of Detroit and encourage more visitors. 

For more info on the charity, please visit http://opportunitydetroit.com/about-us.

    -Madison Lennox




 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
       
       
SENIOR JACKIE FEIST SIGNED TO IOWA FOR TRACK
 
 
 
 
 
 
Groves Scriptor